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Started by yossam, July 21, 2012, 03:51:31 pm

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Walli

my 0.25 is a lot better then your 0.25 ;-)

yossam

Ok here goes.................

Followed T-Us' suggestions:

Added some billowy fractals to the soil surface, changed the water reflectivity to .5, it was at .7 to start. The water already had a density color, so I did not change that. The ray detail multiplier is the big change that to me added some subtle differences to the render. Default is at .25.........I changed it to .5 and really did not see much difference. So I took it to .75 and this is the result. By the way, that change caused an increase of render time by a little over 50%. Was it worth it ?...........you tell me.

Oshyan

I don't think Ray Detail Multiplier will affect reflection quality, just subsurface rendering quality. Also it looks like there's a lot of JPG artifacting (and possibly post process sharpening) on these images (see halos around tree edges), which probably just makes the water noise look worse.

I like the green algae in/on your water, very realistic.

- Oshyan

yossam

The only post processing was a gamma adjustment.

yossam

This is the pic without any compression, only changed to .jpg from .exr and the gamma adjustment.

Oshyan

Must just be JPG artifacts then. Conversion to JPG *always* involves compression, even the larger version you just posted (where you can still see the JPG artifacting I referred to, though it's significantly lessened). Depending on what you're using to save to JPG, you may be able to get better quality at equivalent size with other settings or a different app, e.g. Photoshop's Save For Web option vs. just Save As JPG, or XnView's Export option.

With the fairly high resolution of the image and lots of fine detail, it's going to be hard to compress it to reasonable size without getting those artifacts. I'm not sure if you render at that resolution due to your screen size or some other preference, but for web sharing something more like 1280x1024 or similar is probably better for both file size/compression ratio (quality), as well as people being able to see the entire image without scrolling.

- Oshyan