May the force...............

Started by yossam, November 28, 2014, 11:38:16 am

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AP

It is a teaser, obviously J.J. Abrams is keeping it very secretive. We will know more in the coming months of course.

The books are the Timothy Zahn trilogy and they were supposed to be very well written.

TheBadger

J.J. Abrams,
Lets hope its as good as transformers parts 2-4  ;D  :-\
It has been eaten.


Upon Infinity

All I can say is, if they go back in time and alter the timeline so the first movies never really happened at all, I'm walking out.  I.Am.Walking.OUT.
3D Models / Art Prints: www.uponinfinity.com | YouTube | Twitter | Support My Work

yossam


yossam




TheBadger

A current opinion piece from CNN that makes the argument that G.L. ruined the science fiction film genre forever.
http://www.cnn.com/2014/05/02/opinion/beale-star-wars/index.html
only posting it because I am curious if anyone here has read the science fiction books the article mentions, and if you would recommend one to me.


Also,
Star Wars VII: Or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Death Star #RejectedStarWarsTitles
It has been eaten.

yossam

The Foundation series by Asimov was one I enjoyed. I read them when I was young. Wonder if they would be the same now.  :-\

AP

Personally, I like the original trilogy (Empire being the best) and the prequals were not memorable. Anakin's transition to the dark side did not convince me. Classic sci-fi can be done but I still want to be entertained as well as have a thinking story without a message being forced. It takes a balance and very cleaver writing, just do not bore me. Blade Runner is a great example of all that.

Screw The Matrix!  :P

Upon Infinity

Quote from: TheBadger on November 30, 2014, 11:52:09 pm
A current opinion piece from CNN that makes the argument that G.L. ruined the science fiction film genre forever.
http://www.cnn.com/2014/05/02/opinion/beale-star-wars/index.html
only posting it because I am curious if anyone here has read the science fiction books the article mentions, and if you would recommend one to me.



Hyperbole masquerading as journalism from the Cartoon News Network.   Star Wars didn't kill science fiction, as Pablo pointed out G.L. regards it as fantasy.  Technically, it's classified as a western so, there's that.  And wasn't Gravity one of the bigger movies last year?  The author did get one thing right.  That there is very little creativity left in the series.  But that doesn't mean it still can't be good.   ;D
3D Models / Art Prints: www.uponinfinity.com | YouTube | Twitter | Support My Work

Kadri

Quote from: TheBadger on November 30, 2014, 11:52:09 pm
A current opinion piece from CNN that makes the argument that G.L. ruined the science fiction film genre forever.
...


Funny the posts are better then the article.

I have read probably nearly all Science fiction books of Asimov and
Neuromancer, Enders's Game and Fahrenheit 451.
Hard to say anything Michael. I liked them when i read them. But Asimov for example isn't on my top list now.
I am just curious why they don't make a Foundation series because it does have elements that Hollywood would like.
I have Haldeman's "The Forever War," waiting since some years to read.
"Dune" is great but everybody knows that.

If you want a hard read try "Star Maker" from Olaf Stapledon. Very different but great book.
"The book describes a history of life in the universe, dwarfing in scale Stapledon's previous book,
Last and First Men, a history of the human species over two billion years"
I copy paste something about Olaf Stapledon every time i have the opportunity.
If anyone wants to write about the story of the universe this is a must read. Not sure about the readers although ;)

TheBadger

I'll look up the titles you all mention.

It has been eaten.

Oshyan

Badger, have you read Kim Stanley Robinson's Mars Trilogy yet? I know it comes up a fair amount around here (not least from my own mention, hehe), but somehow I get the feeling his detail-oriented and realistic approach would tickle your fancy. It's a bit dry at the start (first 100 pages or so of Red Mars), but once you get into space and nearing The Red Planet, it gets damn good. Robinson is incredibly smart and he puts a lot of effort into imagining and describing realistic, plausible technology, scenarios, etc.

- Oshyan