Mists of dreams drip along the nascent echo and love no more.

Started by Ethrieltd, April 11, 2017, 09:16:01 pm

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Ethrieltd

Nuclear devices activated, and the machine keeps pushing time through the cogs, like paste into strings into paste again, and only the machine keeps using time to make time to make time...

N-drju

The caption sounds ominous and I don't really get it. ;) But... The starfield looks quite impressive though.
"This year - a factory of semiconductors. Next year - a factory of whole conductors!"

Ethrieltd

Quote from: N-drju on April 13, 2017, 02:17:26 am
The caption sounds ominous and I don't really get it. ;) But... The starfield looks quite impressive though.



It's from Battlestar Galactica : The Plan

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d-j27VHwKWw

The makers of the makers fall before the child...

DocCharly65

Long time ago that I watched the new series... I really couldn't identify the objects as the cylon starbases -- now I got it :)

There's a strange little cap on the pole of the moon... something gone wrong there?
Nice starfield! :)

Ethrieltd

Quote from: DocCharly65 on April 13, 2017, 11:01:10 am
There's a strange little cap on the pole of the moon... something gone wrong there?
Nice starfield! :)


Yeah, didn't notice that before I posted it. Must have happened in post. Been back and re-rendered that area and it's not there. I did some masking for the lens flare/blur and must have introduced it there.

Been back and composited the test render with the original and dealt with it.

The starfield is one from here

http://forums.planetside.co.uk/index.php?topic=4391.msg46100

I did do a bit more trickery though...

I rendered another complete copy of the background without any planets or objects and left out the space dust in the background clip. This gives an exact duplicate of the stars that can be adjusted in levels, etc in Photoshop and composited over the render. In this way you can do subtle tinting and flaring on a star by star basis by simply painting over the star on it's own layer.

It makes the stars really pop, I think.