Nebulae

Started by Denis Sirenko, July 26, 2017, 07:40:59 am

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Denis Sirenko

Thanks, guys!

Quote from: treddie on October 21, 2017, 07:58:26 pm
Awesome attention to detail!


Thanks, that's just why I need Terragen)

Quote from: BigMisch on October 22, 2017, 07:05:10 pm
I'm new to TG and new to the boards...


Welcome! Although I'm also not a veteran yet)

Quote from: KyL on October 22, 2017, 07:48:13 pm
Wonderful photographs :)


Ha-ha) Thanks.

Stormlord

October 29, 2017, 09:09:20 am #106 Last Edit: October 29, 2017, 09:31:04 am by Stormlord
This is my latest attempt to create another fine astro picture based upon the cloud generator from Denis.
This time I masked several stars from real space photos and also some dust lanes as well.

[attachimg=1]
SILVER CLOUD
The effect comes more and more realistic and looks 3D like.

[attachimg=2]
Masked stars in Poposhop

[attachimg=3]
Sample Image of a masked dust cloud

[attachimg=4]
Sample Image of the masked star Formalhaut (Original Star Size 9500px x 9500px)

STORMLORD

Denis Sirenko

This is a good job! I correctly understood that your illustration now uses the stars that you got from the photos below?

In the photo of Fomalhaut I really like the distribution of large, medium and small stars around Fomalhaut (starfield). But I still do not like the glare around Fomalhaut. It still seems too clouded to me. Because we do not see such a radiance around the Sun on the images with the ISS. And the Sun is a typical star.

And, Dirk, I still insist that the light around the star is an optical effect, not part of the star itself. This means that in the illustration, dark nebulae should be as if behind a star, although in fact they are in front of it. The irony is that the image of the star on the photographic images of cosmic telescopes we see so radiant only because of the imperfection of the receiver of light. The real image of a star is an infinitesimal point, so small that if it were not for this scatter on the receiver, we would not have seen it at all.

Stormlord

Quote from: Denis Sirenko on October 31, 2017, 05:44:39 am
And, Dirk, I still insist that the light around the star is an optical effect, not part of the star itself. This means that in the illustration, dark nebulae should be as if behind a star, although in fact they are in front of it. The irony is that the image of the star on the photographic images of cosmic telescopes we see so radiant only because of the imperfection of the receiver of light. The real image of a star is an infinitesimal point, so small that if it were not for this scatter on the receiver, we would not have seen it at all.


As far as I know, what we see from the sun is only the core. The glow around... this fine and faint glow which you can see in the evening belongs all to our sun! So the glow is part of our sun or stars. But nevertheless, In Astrophotos we usually don't see this faint glow around other stars. The glow in my picture above locks impressive and this is the reason why I put them into it.

by the way Denis, dId you receive my mail with the star mask?

STORMLORD

Denis Sirenko

November 01, 2017, 11:45:37 am #109 Last Edit: November 01, 2017, 11:54:11 am by Denis Sirenko
By the way, I incorrectly said: "The real image of a star is an infinitesimal point, so small that if it were not for this scatter on the receiver, we would not have seen it at all." In fact, the pixel will shine, but only one pixel, which opposite the star.

I think it's easier to show what I mean. The left picture below shows how you realize the obscuration of the dark nebula. And in the right picture I showed how it really should happen on astrophoto. Even if the dark nebula is closer than the star. The star is further away, but the glare is closer. The glare is created by the camera lens. It's just light scattered by the optical elements of the lens. The  core of the star is very, very small. Less than the pixel size of the photosensitive matrix. For the demonstration, I used your wonderful picture of Fomalhaut.

[attachimg=1]

On the left you can see that the dark nebula is blocking the star's radiance. It's as if the sun was completely blocked by the horizon at sunset (оn the right is the original correct the setting sun picture).

[attachimg=2]

Dirk, I saw the letter, I want to study it more closely tomorrow.

Denis Sirenko

Hello! I have a small update! It's Dzenas nebulae.

I decided to draw another cosmic apocalypse. Here I have a very mysterious event. I myself do not quite understand the reasons for such an annular formation. Apparently, the stars that have done this are no longer alive. Need to make a scientific study :)

[attachimg=1]

In general, as always, everything was generated me TG. In Photoshop: post-process (correction of colors, composition) stars, additional light nebulae and a small pulsar in the background. A little artistic looks, but it's intended;)

luvsmuzik

In 70 years we have so advanced to see what before we could only imagine. Art imitating life or space.  :) Great images all, thanks!

Denis Sirenko

Thank you!

Yes, it's amazing. I do not praise myself, but praise the achievements of science, technology, art and other achievements of intelligent life. If all the time from the beginning of the birth of the Universe to the present moment to present as one year (at least half the time was spent on creating an intelligent life, or maybe all the time), then the last 70 years is only 0.2 seconds! The analogy, unfortunately, is not mine, but it's wonderful.

Why, by the way, exactly 70?

luvsmuzik

I picked 70 years because before that we relied on earth's telescopes mostly for astronomical observation. Man reached further for the stars and got there. All technology, especially photography, has enlightened us with color and scale. Now we can imitate, in many media forms, with reasonable accuracy what the dreamers imagined. I have lived long enough to see most of this occur, so with comparison of historical theory and now fact, it is truly amazing!

Denis Sirenko

Ah, got it. It is clear and here I do not argue.

Agura Nata


Denis Sirenko


sboerner

Fascinating discussion. Denis, it sounds like you may have a background in astronomy and/or optics. Did I miss that? (I just quickly scanned this thread.) Beautiful, beautiful work. Art imitating life indeed.

Denis Sirenko

Thanks, Sboerner!

My english is not very reliable, unfortunately. "Background" - do you mean my other experience in real life? If so, I have experience in selling optical devices, including amateur telescopes, microscopes, binoculars... And just love astronomy, I try regularly read and watch something :)

sboerner

Your English is just fine - that's exactly what I meant by "background." Your interest in and knowledge of astronomy shines through here. Keep up the great work.