Creating Natural 3D Environments with Alex Alvarez

Started by DannyG, September 22, 2017, 06:53:40 pm

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jaf

Nice, but very "pricey".  Alex is a very good speaker.
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zaxxon

I've watched the video and it's a very complete introduction to photogrametry. Alvarez is an excellent teacher!

jaf

I'd be interested how much the standard edition of Agisoft Photoscan ($179 usd) can do, as far as what he demonstrated, compared to the professional edition ($3499 usd)?
(28nov19) Ryzen 1800x, 970 EVO 1TB M.2 SSD, Corsair Vengeance 64GB DDR4 3200 Mem,  EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti FTW3 Graphics 441.41 (27nov19), Win 10 Pro x64, Terragen Pro 4.4.45, BenchMark 0:10:02


bobbystahr

Quote from: jaf on September 23, 2017, 06:42:24 pm
I'd be interested how much the standard edition of Agisoft Photoscan ($179 usd) can do, as far as what he demonstrated, compared to the professional edition ($3499 usd)?


I'd guess 20%....
something borrowed,
something Blue.
Ring out the Old.
Bring in the New
Bobby Stahr, Paracosmologist

bobbystahr

something borrowed,
something Blue.
Ring out the Old.
Bring in the New
Bobby Stahr, Paracosmologist

PabloMack

September 27, 2017, 05:12:56 pm #7 Last Edit: September 27, 2017, 05:36:32 pm by PabloMack
I first learned about photo-grammetry from paleontologists using the technology to digitize dinosaur track ways.

Agisoft is the software that I have been using but I don't have the professional version which is much more expensive. I watched most of the video and it was nice to have all of my conclusions reinforced by someone who is more professional in that area than I am. It was like "Yeah, yeah, that's what I think and that's what I have done myself". I had gone through most of the experiences he described and even remember grabbing a nice looking piece of dead wood to make a model from. Where he departed from what I have done is with all of those strobe flash units. Instead of those I've been using timed exposures to increase the light but it is more time consuming. You have to have your camera on a tripod and either a remote shutter release or a shutter release delay to avoid camera shake which makes your sessions even more time-consuming. I built my own "lazy susan" which is large enough and robust enough for large objects like humans. I selected a rotary bearing that will support weights of up to 1000 pounds. I marked my increments at 15° instead of 10°. My choice was arbitrary. If I'd watched this video before making my lazy susan I would have followed his recommendation.

Another thing that I would add that I didn't hear Alex talk about in the video is that your objects need to have a lot of detailed texture over the whole object. If you try to use a model that has a lot of solid uniform colors, photogrametry doesn't work so well as limited detail can't be used by the software to surmise accurate geometry. So that is the main problem with photogrametry. For models with blurry-textures, laser scanning is much better. Another option might be to run some software that uses the Microsoft Kinect camera. The infrared camera actually measures distances so digitizing a model doesn't depend on the RGB camera for solving the 3D geometry and is only needed for creating the texture maps.

Nice video. Thanks Danny...