planet pack

Started by omag, April 04, 2020, 09:54:02 pm

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omag

Hi guys I am currently learning this program and specifically on how to do renders like this image here C5Oi6AQVcAEEpBS.jpg which supposedly is by nvseal for his planet pack 3, was going to buy it but it seems that it has been removed and is nowhere to be found anymore. I have been looking for project files similar to this for ages as it seems there is no tutorial on how to create scenes exactly like this, in my frustration I have come here to ask u guys for help. Any of u willing to share your own setup or point me in a direction as to where i can find or buy project files like this, it would be most appreciated. Thanks in advance.

luvsmuzik

Try this link in User Tutorials.....I cannot stress enough the internal search engine of this forum. I think you could probably adapt this tutorial for current TG versions. :)

https://planetside.co.uk/forums/index.php/topic,12710.0.html

WAS

Welcome to the forums. When working on something like this in a global perspective, try to think about how each layer of clouds works individually. Maybe play around with getting familiar with the cloud fractal settings and cloud settings.

nvseal's presets seem to be pretty rough to my eye but it seems to possibly be 3 layers, low level (small noisy clouds) mid level large clouds, and high level thin clouds.

Have a look at this example file. I'm not positive if the preview I saved is from that working file exactly (there are iterations) but more or less should be the same.

Hannes

That looks pretty cool, Jordan!

sboerner

Very cool. Thank you for the share. Will be looking into this one.

WAS

April 06, 2020, 03:56:15 pm #5 Last Edit: April 06, 2020, 04:08:00 pm by WAS
Enjoy. To note, one thing is missing from the formula and that's global currents. They push the clouds about giving impressions of some twists. This can be done with octave warping but needs to be large lead in. You could use just warp the Cloud fractals with A warp input and redirect or something, or warp the distribution. Usually there is more longitude warping than latitude.