AMD 5000 series

Started by WAS, November 15, 2020, 02:57:35 pm

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WAS

Sounds good. May have to go for one of these instead.

https://venturebeat.com/2020/11/14/amd-ryzen-5000-especially-the-5600x-is-blowing-my-mind/amp/

Can't wait until I see some benchmarks here with them.

N-drju

Perfect! Thanks for validating my choice. :D I guess 5950x will be worth the wait.

I was a little worried by the fact that it is, in fact, slower than 3950x on the lowest speed but my vendor says it's okay as it means lower energy consumption when idling.
"This year - a factory of semiconductors. Next year - a factory of whole conductors!"

Dune

What would energy use in such a machine (like a 3950x) be anyway when idling? Any idea?

N-drju

Quote from: Dune on November 16, 2020, 08:26:04 amWhat would energy use in such a machine (like a 3950x) be anyway when idling? Any idea?
If I understood their point correctly, the higher the lowest CPU frequency is, the higher the energy consumption will be when idle.

That could mean, that your 3950x would consume a little bit more power than 5950x when idling, as it has 3.5GHz minimal frequency whereas 5950x lowest stands at 3.4GHz.

However, the tide will turn when both CPUs work at highest capacity with 3950x consuming less energy at 4.7 compared to 5950x's 4.9GHz.
"This year - a factory of semiconductors. Next year - a factory of whole conductors!"

Dune

Thanks, that makes sense. It might be negligable anyway. I was actually thinking about the overall use of energy of a high power machine when doing nothing extreme. I can't imagine it would suck all 750 Watts out of the wall then. But is it 50W, like an average old fashioned lightbulb, or less, or at least a few hundred anyway? No idea.

WAS

It should idle lower than the base clock speed. My 2600 is 3.4ghz with a boost of 3.9ghz, and idles at 2.2ghz. system uses around 120-150watts idle keeping the fancy lights off helps keep it down to 120 watts.

N-drju

Quote from: WAS on November 16, 2020, 12:11:29 pmIt should idle lower than the base clock speed. My 2600 is 3.4ghz with a boost of 3.9ghz, and idles at 2.2ghz. system uses around 120-150watts idle keeping the fancy lights off helps keep it down to 120 watts.
This makes sense as well. I guess there is indeed no real reason for a CPU to work at a declared minimal when even less power could be used.

There are indeed some fancy cases out there which are lit like an x-mas tree. 😉 I plan to get something more basic.
"This year - a factory of semiconductors. Next year - a factory of whole conductors!"

KlausK

The 750W is the maximum Watt Power the power suplly can deliver - in theory.
How much the components of a PC actually consume depends on various factors.
Are they in idle/sleep mode or are they under full load.
One might think it does not make a big difference but, look at the numbers over a year
and you`ll be surprised how much money you could spend.

For example:
Let`s say the pc has a Watt power of 450 W over a 8 h working day.
The price for 1 kWh is about 25 ct..

That makes 4kWh per day = 0.90 €
Per year this is 1314kWh = 328.50 €

This is for 365 days. A little bit too much perhaps, but the workhours of your pc might be much higher
because of rendering over night or during weekends. So this is a quite ok calculation to work with.
This is about what a Gaming computer with a multicore CPU, fast RAM and a graphic card with 8GB VRAM
would need on average it seems when it is under high load. I have read that somewhere when I was building a new computer in 2017.
The Video card is the one with the highest power consumption.

If you get a certified power supply ("Gold" or "Platinum") you can be sure it is efficient under varying circumstances.
The efficiency of a power supply unit should be above 90%, I think. The smaller lower power consumption over the year will show.

Get something that fits your components well, not too small and not too big in terms of Watt power it can deliver
and you are on the safe side. Just look at the numbers of the components, add them up and you have a rough estimate
about the max power consumption.

All the other components like monitors, hdds, your router, printer whatever are not even taken into account...
So, I think it`s fair to say, I guess, that spending a little more time and perhaps money to get well built components
will save you money in the long run.

Get a wall socket power meter. They can withstand a power consumption of about 2000 Watt very often.
Which should be enough for a socket strip where your computer sits in. Over here you can rent them from your power supplier.
Or buy one in a home improvement shop or something like that. Nice gimmick ;)

To get a feel for the money you spend on power there are website tools that let you calculate power consumption.

CHeers, Klaus
/ ASUS WS Mainboard / Dual XEON E5-2640v3 / 64GB RAM / NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 TI / Win7 Ultimate

WAS

November 16, 2020, 01:18:17 pm #8 Last Edit: November 16, 2020, 01:22:11 pm by WAS
Quote from: KlausK on November 16, 2020, 12:33:56 pmThe 750W is the maximum Watt Power the power suplly can deliver - in theory.
How much the components of a PC actually consume depends on various factors.
Are they in idle/sleep mode or are they under full load.
One might think it does not make a big difference but, look at the numbers over a year
and you`ll be surprised how much money you could spend.

For example:
Let`s say the pc has a Watt power of 450 W over a 8 h working day.
The price for 1 kWh is about 25 ct..

That makes 4kWh per day = 0.90 €
Per year this is 1314kWh = 328.50 €

This is for 365 days. A little bit too much perhaps, but the workhours of your pc might be much higher
because of rendering over night or during weekends. So this is a quite ok calculation to work with.
This is about what a Gaming computer with a multicore CPU, fast RAM and a graphic card with 8GB VRAM
would need on average it seems when it is under high load. I have read that somewhere when I was building a new computer in 2017.
The Video card is the one with the highest power consumption.

If you get a certified power supply ("Gold" or "Platinum") you can be sure it is efficient under varying circumstances.
The efficiency of a power supply unit should be above 90%, I think. The smaller lower power consumption over the year will show.

Get something that fits your components well, not too small and not too big in terms of Watt power it can deliver
and you are on the safe side. Just look at the numbers of the components, add them up and you have a rough estimate
about the max power consumption.

All the other components like monitors, hdds, your router, printer whatever are not even taken into account...
So, I think it`s fair to say, I guess, that spending a little more time and perhaps money to get well built components
will save you money in the long run.

Get a wall socket power meter. They can withstand a power consumption of about 2000 Watt very often.
Which should be enough for a socket strip where your computer sits in. Over here you can rent them from your power supplier.
Or buy one in a home improvement shop or something like that. Nice gimmick ;)

To get a feel for the money you spend on power there are website tools that let you calculate power consumption.

CHeers, Klaus

Power must be expensive over there. I don't know what all my equipment was consuming at my apartment but I had 4 PCs going, 2 entertainment systems including a 480p mammoth 37in television my dad wouldn't get rid of. Ontop of lighting, consoles, cable equipment, etc, and we paid about 320 USD total in a year. Payments usually around 26 bucks a month.

I live in a RV now, and while it's technically 50amp, park only has 30 amp. So I only got 5000 peak watts really to work with, and that's assuming no one is on our daisy chain, otherwise voltage is variated craps out. I have to sanitize and regulate power to my PC cause of how bad the park power is (talking sometimes 80v out of a 110v plug. )

N-drju

Quote from: KlausK on November 16, 2020, 12:33:56 pmThat makes 4kWh per day = 0.90 €
Per year this is 1314kWh = 328.50 €
Sounds pretty realistic unfortunately... Sadly, average energy cost for a 3-person family down here is a whooping 500 Euro / year. It's a nightmare.

Costs of living aside, here's a nice comparison of the energy consumption of some of the many COTS CPUs:

https://www.guru3d.com/articles-pages/amd-ryzen-9-5900x-and-5950x-review,7.html

Just like I said - 3950x fares better when multithreading, while 5950x consumes less when idling.
"This year - a factory of semiconductors. Next year - a factory of whole conductors!"

Dune

Thanks for your comprehensive calculation, Klaus. Just over €300/year wouldn't even be that bad. Most of the time it would just be changing variables in TG (or other software) anyway, no hard rendering, so a machine would probably use much less that 450W most time.

Yes, I think energy is more expensive in Europe (like petrol), we're paying quite something too.

WAS

Quote from: Dune on November 17, 2020, 05:03:03 amThanks for your comprehensive calculation, Klaus. Just over €300/year wouldn't even be that bad. Most of the time it would just be changing variables in TG (or other software) anyway, no hard rendering, so a machine would probably use much less that 450W most time.

Yes, I think energy is more expensive in Europe (like petrol), we're paying quite something too.

Oh most certainly. My current PC only has a 450 watt PSU (technically by my calculations the distributor is undercoating the PC I've discovered and my be issue of the kernal-power failures; cyberpowerpc refuses to answer inquiries there strangely but very talkative about any other issue) but everything including the GPU idles around 120watts with the RGB crap off.

Also thanks for sharing that power consumption list N-drju