Final position vs. Position in texture/terrain: A visual aid

Started by sboerner, May 25, 2021, 02:10:07 pm

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Dune

Quote from: sboerner on May 26, 2021, 11:32:59 amOr do you just not worry about it?
I don't really. Colors in nature are wild and quite unpredictable anyway, and I've never heard anyone complaining about mismatched colors in my scenes. Not even in the latest shorescene, where it also occurs ;)  The main problem I'm having is to color fake stones and get the stone colors onto the stones and not in the soil around it, or soil color over part of the stones. Fiddling with an XYZ usually does the trick to update color space, using a world transform after the stones often doesn't.

And to really match smaller colors and displacements to updated (by compute terrain) geometry, you'd indeed need a small patch size, like Jordan says, especially when working in detail, and not vast mountainous areas, where you can easily delete the compute terrain (not always though).
My 2 cents.

WAS

Quote from: Dune on May 27, 2021, 02:48:41 am
Quote from: sboerner on May 26, 2021, 11:32:59 amOr do you just not worry about it?
I don't really. Colors in nature are wild and quite unpredictable anyway, and I've never heard anyone complaining about mismatched colors in my scenes. Not even in the latest shorescene, where it also occurs ;)  The main problem I'm having is to color fake stones and get the stone colors onto the stones and not in the soil around it, or soil color over part of the stones. Fiddling with an XYZ usually does the trick to update color space, using a world transform after the stones often doesn't.

And to really match smaller colors and displacements to updated (by compute terrain) geometry, you'd indeed need a small patch size, like Jordan says, especially when working in detail, and not vast mountainous areas, where you can easily delete the compute terrain (not always though).
My 2 cents.

If you do need, like let's say intersections at a distance or something, mixing in two compute terrains by distance works wonders. Get the best of both worlds. Foreground is nicely detailed, and can still have snow favoring depressions on distant mountains, but not favoring tiny patch sizes like your foreground