Procedural Night Sky

Started by dandelO, September 05, 2008, 08:57:58 pm

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Seth


rcallicotte

So this is Disney World.  Can we live here?

Technical Ben

Works a treat. And a free moon as well? Wow! I notice how the moons co-ordinates are correct too. :)
Is it really that big in the sky? It looks massive on my renders. (just to ask, not doubting you one second)
Also, how would I increase or decrease the amount of stars? Thanks again. Great job.

dandelO

January 03, 2010, 12:12:49 pm #18 Last Edit: January 31, 2010, 08:36:50 am by dandelO
No matter, I'm an idiot.

TheBlackHole

You might want a radius of 1.73753e+006 for the moon. That's the real radius. As for distance, you'd want 37.8022e+006 or something. I might include this file in a default project like dandelO. Might also put some of the clouds from "Rocky Hills" in it.
They just issued a tornado warning and said to stay away from windows. Does that mean I can't use my computer?

Henry Blewer

I read somewhere, from Matt I think, that using real distances adds compute time and increases noise. I would use the planet coordinates that the program generates then adjust the size, height angle, and heading. Scale is often relative.
http://flickr.com/photos/njeneb/
Forget Tuesday; It's just Monday spelled with a T

Matt

January 03, 2010, 06:55:44 pm #21 Last Edit: January 03, 2010, 06:57:55 pm by Matt
Quote from: njeneb on January 03, 2010, 02:52:16 pm
I read somewhere, from Matt I think, that using real distances adds compute time and increases noise. I would use the planet coordinates that the program generates then adjust the size, height angle, and heading. Scale is often relative.


I think you might be remembering something Oshyan wrote about an eclipse simulation. Oshyan wasn't exactly correct about the reasons for the noise, but it was to do with soft shadows in atmosphere spread over a very large area. Not a problem here.

If you're talking about accuracy problems that occur due to rounding of very large numbers, you only need to worry about that if you get close to the object, i.e. if both camera and object are far from the origin.
Just because milk is white doesn't mean that clouds are made of milk.

Henry Blewer

http://flickr.com/photos/njeneb/
Forget Tuesday; It's just Monday spelled with a T

dandelO

January 03, 2010, 11:40:05 pm #23 Last Edit: January 31, 2010, 08:37:06 am by dandelO
No matter, I'm an idiot.

g.makulik

Hi Martin,

Thanks for your great work! As I am a beginner in TG2, your library helps me a lot getting into the advanced stuff and to see how to use the loads of different shader types and functions effectively.

I have used the procedural night sky in the attached pic. It's the 1st notable one I have made with TG2. I know there are a lot of things to be improved on this image, especially the fog on the watersurface doesn't look very realistic.

Has anyone ideas how to cast a bit (more) of light on the altocumulus clouds? I'd like to have them 'glowing' seams where the moonlight shines through. I'm not so sure about the moonlight at all, I've placed an additional light source 'round' the moon, it's size is just a bit bigger, and strenghened the light (whatever this exactly means). But the pics main lighting effects are done using an increased environmental light. I see only little effect coming from the moonlight so far.

WBR
G√ľnther

TheBlackHole

Put the sun behind the moon and uncheck "Cast Shadows" on the moon. You'll get bright lighting. Tone the light down to a dark gray, and voila, moonlight.
They just issued a tornado warning and said to stay away from windows. Does that mean I can't use my computer?

dandelO

January 05, 2010, 04:19:52 pm #26 Last Edit: January 31, 2010, 08:37:17 am by dandelO
No matter, I'm an idiot.

choronr

Quote from: TheBlackHole on January 05, 2010, 03:59:02 pm
Put the sun behind the moon and uncheck "Cast Shadows" on the moon. You'll get bright lighting. Tone the light down to a dark gray, and voila, moonlight.
'Brilliant'! I've been looking for something like this ...thank you.