Planetscape Paintings from an Interstellar Journey

Started by Zairyn Arsyn, July 18, 2012, 11:29:32 am

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Zairyn Arsyn

WARNING! WIZARDS! DO NOT PREDICT THE BEHAVIOR OF OTTERS UNLESS YOU OBEY BIG HAPPY TOES.

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Zairyn Arsyn

WARNING! WIZARDS! DO NOT PREDICT THE BEHAVIOR OF OTTERS UNLESS YOU OBEY BIG HAPPY TOES.

i7 2600k 3.4GHZ|G.skill 16GB 1600MHZ|Asus P8P67 EVO|Evga 770GTX 4GB|SB X-FI|Antec 750W
http://zlain81.deviantart.com/

cyphyr

Nicely done and it's got to be TG, hasn't it ... ?
Richard
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Oshyan

Some incredible work there, very good sense of (massive) scale in many of them. Most look like straight "hand" painting, some with photo composite elements. A few do look like 3D renders though...

This one is particularly unusual and interesting. Not necessarily realistic, but it certainly makes you wonder what's going on...



- Oshyan

Zairyn Arsyn

Quote from: Oshyan on July 18, 2012, 01:40:09 pm
Some incredible work there, very good sense of (massive) scale in many of them. Most look like straight "hand" painting, some with photo composite elements. A few do look like 3D renders though...

This one is particularly unusual and interesting. Not necessarily realistic, but it certainly makes you wonder what's going on...



- Oshyan

makes wonder/imagine whats going on on the surface, that would be awesome to witness from down there.
WARNING! WIZARDS! DO NOT PREDICT THE BEHAVIOR OF OTTERS UNLESS YOU OBEY BIG HAPPY TOES.

i7 2600k 3.4GHZ|G.skill 16GB 1600MHZ|Asus P8P67 EVO|Evga 770GTX 4GB|SB X-FI|Antec 750W
http://zlain81.deviantart.com/

TheBadger

There is some very inspirational stuff in that link. Thanks man!
It has been eaten.

Matt

Very dubious scientific plausibility here, but they look awesome :)
Just because milk is white doesn't mean that clouds are made of milk.

cyphyr

Quote from: Matt on July 18, 2012, 07:21:42 pm
Very dubious scientific plausibility here, but they look awesome :)


Actually I think they may have touched on something there, particularly in the "two worlds" image posted. Every animation or image I have ever seen of planets colliding has shown them coming together like a couple of pool balls hitting each other practically head on, resulting in a colossal display of fireworks. Surly it would be more likely that given most planets result from the concretion of the stellar disk of material (think a massive amorphous version of Saturn's rings slowly condensing into individual planets), all the planets would be travelling in the same direction and at roughly the same speed. That would mean that planets would gradually be pulled towards each other over many millennia as their orbital paths become closer and closer and only actually "meeting" relatively gently. Of course by gentle I do mean massively destructive tidal and gravitational forces and huge electro magnetic disturbances due to the combining of two electromagnetic fields. It would be massively destructive but not in the way always shown on TV docs. It would be interesting to visualise with some decent simulation software but I doubt the result would be the "impacts" as shown on TV.
Cheers
Richard
www.richardfraser.co.uk
https://www.facebook.com/RichardFraserVFX/
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Matt

Quote from: cyphyr on July 19, 2012, 05:50:24 am
Quote from: Matt on July 18, 2012, 07:21:42 pm
Very dubious scientific plausibility here, but they look awesome :)

Actually I think they may have touched on something there, particularly in the "two worlds" image posted.


I wasn't just talking about the image copied above - I think there's very dubious scientific plausibility in some of the other images in the article too. Rocks floating in the stratosphere of pristine-looking worlds without evidence of massive bombardment, is just one example. (As I said, they are still great to look at.)

Quote
Every animation or image I have ever seen of planets colliding has shown them coming together like a couple of pool balls hitting each other practically head on, resulting in a colossal display of fireworks. Surly it would be more likely that given most planets result from the concretion of the stellar disk of material (think a massive amorphous version of Saturn's rings slowly condensing into individual planets), all the planets would be travelling in the same direction and at roughly the same speed. That would mean that planets would gradually be pulled towards each other over many millennia as their orbital paths become closer and closer and only actually "meeting" relatively gently. Of course by gentle I do mean massively destructive tidal and gravitational forces and huge electro magnetic disturbances due to the combining of two electromagnetic fields. It would be massively destructive but not in the way always shown on TV docs. It would be interesting to visualise with some decent simulation software but I doubt the result would be the "impacts" as shown on TV.
Cheers
Richard


Don't you think that two planets in our solar system would collide at thousands of miles per hour *even* if they converged from two very similar orbits? It doesn't take long for an object in the proximity of the earth to be accelerated to thousands of miles per hour relative to the earth even when starting from a relative velocity of zero. You never see meteorites coming in "gently".

Matt
Just because milk is white doesn't mean that clouds are made of milk.

Tangled-Universe

Those meteorites are a lot lighter than the huge planet-like rocks in the images. Meteorites will be easily accelarated like you describe (gravitational sling) but large bodies will accelarate considerably slower due to their huge mass. Consequently, their mass will also affect the earth's rotation.
If it wouldn't work that way then there wouldn't be starsystems I think as all celestial bodies would toss each other around.

In the end you're still right; Imagine two celestial bodies hitting eachother because their outer circumference of their orbit just slightly slightly overlapped. It's not a head on collission, more side by side, but both their speed is great already.

Matt

Quote from: Tangled-Universe on July 20, 2012, 02:47:33 am
Those meteorites are a lot lighter than the huge planet-like rocks in the images. Meteorites will be easily accelarated like you describe (gravitational sling) but large bodies will accelarate considerably slower due to their huge mass.


Lighter objects fall at the same speed as heavier objects (in a vacuum).

Matt
Just because milk is white doesn't mean that clouds are made of milk.

Matt

Quote from: Tangled-Universe on July 20, 2012, 02:47:33 am
If it wouldn't work that way then there wouldn't be starsystems I think as all celestial bodies would toss each other around.


The currently held belief seems to be that there were more planets in the early solar system - many of which either collided with each other or the Sun or were ejected from the system completely - and that what's left over are planets that settled into (or were born with) stable orbits that are not upset by the other bodies in the system. Orbital harmonics has a part to play in this, I believe. Also I think a big component of this may be "survival of the fittest", where planets with "unfit" orbits did not survive to the present day.

Quote
In the end you're still right; Imagine two celestial bodies hitting eachother because their outer circumference of their orbit just slightly slightly overlapped. It's not a head on collission, more side by side, but both their speed is great already.


The only thing that really matters at the time of collision is the relative velocity. You can choose a frame of reference (either one planet or the other, or the centre of mass of the two planets) and calculate the mutual acceleration of the two planets in that frame. And I think that the relative velocity would be in the thousands of miles per hour, just like it is with comets and meteorites.

Matt
Just because milk is white doesn't mean that clouds are made of milk.