Some games for Oculus demos here

Started by TheBadger, January 21, 2015, 04:39:29 am

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TheBadger

January 21, 2015, 04:39:29 am Last Edit: January 21, 2015, 04:42:25 am by TheBadger
http://bgr.com/2015/01/20/teens-react-to-oculus-rift-horror-game/ after a long ad. Shows people playing with a screen of what they are seeing. The screen only shows where the controller they use points, not where the players head is turned. But you will get the idea. beta version.

store: https://share.oculus.com/app/affected-dk2---the-oculus-rift-horror-experience
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archonforest

Quote from: TheBadger on January 21, 2015, 04:39:29 am
http://bgr.com/2015/01/20/teens-react-to-oculus-rift-horror-game/ after a long ad. Shows people playing with a screen of what they are seeing. The screen only shows where the controller they use points, not where the players head is turned. But you will get the idea. beta version.

store: https://share.oculus.com/app/affected-dk2---the-oculus-rift-horror-experience

OH YEAH!!! :D :D
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PabloMack

January 23, 2015, 08:59:03 am #2 Last Edit: January 23, 2015, 09:00:51 am by PabloMack
I met someone in town who is in the virtual reality business. Saturday he brought over an Occulus Rift to demo ($4K!). He had made a trip to Hawaii and had used one of those 360Hero camera rigs to record a boat trip. It was monoscopic but there is a stereoscopic version. It was my first experience wearing one of those head sets. It takes a 6K spherical video to get enough resolution for any one particular viewer's POV. With TG requiring the computing power it does to create a traditional HD video you can expect to double that to do stereoscopic and multiply that by another order of magnitude to do a spherical version. When used for rendering games you only have to generate the images as needed so the computing power required is no more than for a normal video game.

TheBadger

Quote from: PabloMack on January 23, 2015, 08:59:03 am
I met someone in town who is in the virtual reality business. Saturday he brought over an Occulus Rift to demo ($4K!). He had made a trip to Hawaii and had used one of those 360Hero camera rigs to record a boat trip. It was monoscopic but there is a stereoscopic version. It was my first experience wearing one of those head sets. It takes a 6K spherical video to get enough resolution for any one particular viewer's POV. With TG requiring the computing power it does to create a traditional HD video you can expect to double that to do stereoscopic and multiply that by another order of magnitude to do a spherical version. When used for rendering games you only have to generate the images as needed so the computing power required is no more than for a normal video game.


What do you mean "$"4k?

The rest of what you wrote is also confusing me. I have been on the developers forum, and I have not run into such depressing numbers there yet. 

So I guess you are talking about video and full mobility in the VR for the user? I would like to know more about this, the farthest I can figure for video (including animation without a realtime renderer ((unity is recommended in the oculus forums, and a free version is out soon!)) is a sphere where video plays all around you, but you can only turn your head not move through the VR scene on your own. In that case resolution can be rather low. Just think of the sphere as being very very large (the viewer could be floating between the earth and the moon for example) In this case even if you could move around (in my example meant for TG) things are so far away they would not change perspective anyway.

^^ This is the simplest way I can think of do try something without unity or an equivalent. TG would be quite good for this. But if you are talking about full mobility for the viewer in the video environment, I would very much like to know how that is even assembled?! Let alone recorded?

I have a thread there on this question but I have not checked it in a few days. The last I was told there is that there is no software available yet that can do this.
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PabloMack

January 23, 2015, 09:53:55 am #4 Last Edit: January 23, 2015, 10:04:49 am by PabloMack
Quote from: TheBadger on January 23, 2015, 09:45:51 amWhat do you mean "$"4k?


Yes. I mean Four Thousand Dollars (US currency). That's what he said he paid for it. And, no, I don't mean that the resolution of the display in the visor is 4K. It isn't even 2K. It is more like SD. To support an HD visor you would need more like a 12K spherical movie.

I would look to something like the Microsoft Hololens for something more affordable. I think Occulus's time window of opportunity will not last very long. Seems Samsung is working (maybe with Occulus) to bring something like this to the masses for much less cost.

As for watching pre-recorded (or rendered) movies, it is as you say. You can only see the perspective of the camera that recorded (or rendered) the movie. So in this mode the image generator can only use the rotational information provided by the visor to bring that view of the whole sphere into the frame. The If you use a real time game engine then the translational information can be used as well so that the "virtual camera" can move with the visor in real time.

TheBadger

January 23, 2015, 10:32:21 am #5 Last Edit: January 23, 2015, 10:41:34 am by TheBadger
So what happened when you put it on?! What were you looking at, and how was it made?

QuoteI mean Four Thousand Dollars That's what he said he paid for it (US currency)

Then he is crazy. The DK is only $350.00. https://www.oculus.com/order/ and the finished product will be less.

The samsung will be out very very soon, but it only works with one of their phones. I mean one of their phones was make to work with their oculus, and their oculus won't work on any other device... Which is strange, it makes me think that there will be a different oculus for everything (Xbox, smart TV, Wii, phones, whatever else), and I am not buying different Rifts to use on netflix and Amazon, or whatever would be a better example... Sony has its own system not based on Oculus.

Anyway, I am a believer. I cant wait for this thing. 2 years from now everything will be made for VR (if not the rift then something else) I can't stop drooling.

But what I meant to ask when I first responded to your post, is it sounds like you are saying that it is pointless for anyone to try. I mean the numbers you gave scare the hell out of me. Only studios could render at those sizes. But I don't understand what you meant. And the reason I posted is because info on video for Oculus is proving very hard to find, even on the oculus forum. So any info you have would be good.
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PabloMack

January 23, 2015, 01:11:25 pm #6 Last Edit: January 23, 2015, 05:51:10 pm by PabloMack
Quote from: TheBadger on January 23, 2015, 10:32:21 amSo what happened when you put it on?! What were you looking at, and how was it made?


What I watched was a spherical movie made into the same form as when you use TG and a spherical camera. The movie frame is a rectangle that must be wrapped around a sphere in order to view it correctly. When you wear the visor it reports orientation back to the video generator which extracts just the portion of the whole video and remaps it as you should be seeing it according to the orientation of the viewer. When the video is paused, you can still turn your head around and look at the various parts of the (still) scene surrounding you. My friend made a live recording using a 360Hero rig that mounts seven Go-pro HD cameras. Five cameras are equally spaced angularly to cover all the way around you in 72 degree arcs along the horizontal. Also there is one camera facing up and one facing down for a total of seven. Some software stitches the seven video streams together into one huge 6K video after you have collected them. The cameras are all WiFi enabled. There is some overlap in the cameras' views so you can actually make the device holding the rig disappear by virtue of the parallax of the various camera views and the redundancy in the coverage. There is a stereoscopic version which uses fourteen cameras. At $400 a pop the rig becomes very expensive. It may be that Randy was telling me that the camera rig plus the oculus viewer and the game engine all together came to about $4K. He probably misunderstood my question. Also, there is a flaw in the way they do the stereoscopy. You must have your head oriented the same way as the stereoscopic cameras or you lose the depth perception. So there is a forward direction to the rig so that if you look up or down then you get the stereoscopic effect. But if you rotate 90 degrees to your right and then look up then you will not get the effect. Also, as you roll (i.e. tilt) your head 90 degrees clockwise or counterclockwise you lose depth perception. The depth information is still there but it becomes non-sensical at 90 degrees. Randy said that the rig was printed with a 3D printer.

Very interesting stuff.

http://www.360heros.com/

Randy gave me a link to a free spherical viewer (called KolorEyes) that you can install on your computer and view a spherical still or movie using your mouse for panning. There is a Mac version. I used it to view a frame I generated with TG using the spherical lens. There seems to be a lot of warping of the edges as you rotate the view around. The paid version will stitch your camera video streams together into one.

http://www.kolor.com/video

TheBadger

Thanks for clarifying what you meant, Pablo.

Yeah, I know about Kolor. I have posted that link here a few times. I have a few of their products. Its a good company, I certainly like them.

For me, I think the thing is (where video is concerned), is just to avoid the parallax issues altogether. Like in my example earlier. But I am Just thinking of ways to keep it simple for basic understanding.

Thank you for reminding me about the hero 360 rig. That was posted here a while ago. But I completely forgot. That really does answer most of my basic questions.

About the *total* price. $4000 sounds like nothing to get in at the ground level of this game. And 6K video? At that price? Nothing to bulk at! I think the only reason you doubt is because we have not seen a 200 million dollar production made by masters in their fields yet. Once we get to see that, And the games are here in a big way, their will be no stoping it. Oculus may fold just because some times one product becomes popular over another, but by any name, it wont stop now.

The biggest thing seems to be getting "presence" right. And in your description I see how that was broken by the issues you listed.

Watch this guys. I posted a while back. But it really gets into the issues http://blog.us.playstation.com/2014/03/18/introducing-project-morpheus/
It is the GDC 2014 sony announcement on their own VR system. completely for games, but it all relates.
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PabloMack

January 23, 2015, 10:40:35 pm #8 Last Edit: January 23, 2015, 10:46:40 pm by PabloMack
Who needs Oculus when you can have one of these?

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00O7CZTLM?psc=1

or if $9.99 is too much how about one of these?

http://www.amazon.com/LLF-Cardboard-Virtual-Reality-Glasses/dp/B00MIBLZ76/ref

TheBadger

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PabloMack


TheBadger

Whats your log-in info for NYT site? ???
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TheBadger

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PabloMack

Quote from: TheBadger on January 29, 2015, 12:49:36 pmWhats your log-in info for NYT site? ???


I didn't need any login. It just started loading and I pressed the play triangle.

TheBadger

All I saw was a log-in page. I think I have to have cookies on, it worked the 2nd time.

Kinda tired of all these unoriginal stories now. They all say the same things, "its really...Wow!" Then in the same breath they say, "Its all hype!". How can it be both "Awesome, industry changing tech, and, all hype?

One thing I had not seen before, but was sure someone would do, is film a live concert for Oculus. Thought that would take longer to happen but there it was. I would like to see the Jack White one. They also mentioned a number of shorts including a WW1 movie (maybe it was WW2). Would like to see that as well.

I found a site in the Rift forum of a guy who is just posting 360 videos made on location at some interesting places. This stuff alone is worth a Rift to me.

But I am also really interested in the holographic stuff Microsoft and others are working on. The story in Pablo's link says maybe this year... That would be very cool too! I think it is a very different thing of course, but I sure want it!

One bit of info I cant find a straight answer on is fps. I read some people saying that anything less than 75fps is fail. And others saying 50something will do. And then even more confusion because there is no separation of video and interactive game discussion.

Why wont standard frame rates apply to 360 video in rift???! Seems that if there is no interactivity other than moving your head, then should be fine?

Pablo, the link also showed a company making soft like Kolor. At least there is two companies now that are on it. The one in your link is also making other soft for VR too. Must check that out.
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