helpful chart

Started by bobbystahr, February 02, 2016, 04:49:45 pm

Previous topic - Next topic

bobbystahr

February 02, 2016, 04:49:45 pm Last Edit: February 02, 2016, 04:59:02 pm by bobbystahr
Spent a bit of time with some models I use often from the free XFROGs and put this comp and text file together. Hope it's useful fo more than me.

CURRY LEAF TREE
It is a small tree, growing 4-6 m (13-20 feet) tall, with a trunk up to 40 cm (16 in) diameter. The aromatic leaves are pinnate, with 11-21 leaflets, each leaflet 2-4 cm (0.79-1.57 in) long and 1-2 cm (0.39-0.79 in) broad. The plant produces small white flowers which can self-pollinate to produce small shiny-black berries containing a single, large viable seed.

AUSTRAILIAN CABBAGE PALM
Functionally dioecious palm. Trunk to 25 m tall, 25-40 cm in diam. breast high, leaf scars raised, internodes broad, brown, longitudinal fissures prominent, petiole stubs retained in the lower 2 m or so, otherwise leaf bases deciduous.

Eucalyptus_globulus_Bluegum
Eucalyptus globulus, the Tasmanian bluegum,[1] southern blue-gum[2] or blue gum, is an evergreen tree, one of the most widely cultivated trees native to Australia. They typically grow from 30-55 m (98-180 ft) tall. The tallest currently known specimen in Tasmania is 90.7 m (298 ft) tall.[3] There are historical claims of even taller trees, the tallest being 101 m (331 ft).[4] The natural distribution of the species includes Tasmania and southern Victoria (particularly the Otway Ranges and southern Gippsland).

PAPER MULBERRY
This species is a deciduous shrub or tree usually growing 10 to 20 meters tall, but known to reach 35 meters at times. The leaves are variable in shape, even on one individual. The blades may be lobed or unlobed, but they usually have toothed edges, lightly hairy, pale undersides, and a rough texture. They are up to about 15 to 20 centimeters long.

QUEEN PALM
Syagrus romanzoffiana, the queen palm or cocos palm, is a palm native to South America, from Paraguay and northern Argentina north to eastern Brazil and west to eastern Bolivia. It had been classified within the Cocos genus as Cocos plumosa, was assigned to Arecastrum, then moved to Syagrus. As a result of the nomenclature confusion, they often retain a previous name in popular usage. It is a medium-sized palm, quickly reaching maturity at a height of up to 15 m (49 ft) tall, with pinnate leaves.

Saw_Banksia
Banksia serrata, commonly known as old man banksia, saw banksia, saw-tooth banksia and red honeysuckle, is a species of woody shrub or tree of the genus Banksia in the family Proteaceae. Native to the east coast of Australia, it is found from Queensland through to Victoria with outlying populations on Tasmania and Flinders Island. Commonly growing as a gnarled tree up to 15 m (50 ft) in height, it can be much smaller in more exposed areas. This Banksia species has wrinkled grey bark and shiny dark green serrated leaves, with large, yellow or greyish-yellow flower spikes, known as inflorescences, appearing over the summer. The flower spikes turn grey as they age and large grey follicles appear.

COASTAL WATTLE
In exposed situations it is a large, prostrate or decumbent shrub, with its trunk and lower branches usually growing along the ground, reaching up to 3 m in height and spreading to 4 m or more horizontally. The oval phyllodes are 50-100 mm long with prominent longitudal veins. The bright yellow flowers occur as elongated spikes up to 50 mm long in the phyllode axils. Flowering occurs mainly in late winter and spring. It occurs on primary dunes, in coastal heath, open forest and alluvial flats. It is used for dune stabilisation on beaches where it will tolerate sea spray and sand blast, providing protection for less hardy plants
ooops...missed the wattle first time


something borrowed,
something Blue.
Ring out the Old.
Bring in the New
Bobby Stahr, Paracosmologist

AP

I don't think i have any of these but it does look to be a very helpful reference.

bobbystahr

February 02, 2016, 06:43:37 pm #2 Last Edit: February 02, 2016, 06:54:45 pm by bobbystahr
Quote from: Chris on February 02, 2016, 06:00:11 pm
I don't think i have any of these but it does look to be a very helpful reference.


they're all at the XFROG freebies/samples site

http://xfrog.com/category/samples.html
something borrowed,
something Blue.
Ring out the Old.
Bring in the New
Bobby Stahr, Paracosmologist

AP

Maybe i do have them but forgot i had them.

bobbystahr

Quote from: Chris on February 02, 2016, 06:55:28 pm
Maybe i do have them but forgot i had them.


bin dere, dun dat
something borrowed,
something Blue.
Ring out the Old.
Bring in the New
Bobby Stahr, Paracosmologist