And Once More... With Feeling

Started by mr-miley, September 12, 2007, 07:42:30 pm

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reck

Oh so this one is yours, I thought you two were some kind of double act, one creates the trees the other hosts them. Didn't realise you dabbled in the tree creation side as well mr M.

mr-miley

Harvey. I didn't think bumpmapping worked. I shall have a go immediately and if it looks good, I'll update the horsechestnt and any others I've got up on my site

reck... Harvey and I were a double act for the last lot we posted, and I have no doubt we will be for the next lot that Harvey creates. I've got the web space so I may as well put it to good use  ;D
I love the smell of caffine in the morning

mr-miley

OK all, I have updated the Horsechestnut.zip file on my site with the new one containing the bumpmap for the bark. I have also updated the preview images as well.
The link is http://www.gintdev.co.uk/mr-miley/tgos.html

Ta

Miles
I love the smell of caffine in the morning

Harvey Birdman

September 17, 2007, 10:26:15 am #18 Last Edit: September 17, 2007, 12:31:04 pm by Harvey Birdman
Oh, it works, all right. Check out the two images. The first has a displacement on the bark of .005 meters - relatively smooth. The second has a displacement of .5 meters.
<edit>
The third has displacement set to .5 meters, and uses the color map as the displacement source, instead of the grayscale version. The difference between the second and third doesn't really look that profound, but with reasonable displacement values the color-based displacement looked blurry, less distinct.
</edit>


And it's really displacement mapped, if I'm not mistake. It's not applied as a bump-map. And the grayscale thing makes sense, if you think about it - that way all the components of a displacement vector are the same magnitude, unaffected by the color. If the unequality of the color components carries over to the displacement vector components, you get ... inconsistent? ... results.

The tree in the image is one of two new smaller palms I just did. The scene I'm working on is heavily displaced and it's difficult to get populations to sit correctly, and if I try to vary the scale it affects the offset I need to get the pops right, so smaller trees disappear into the terrain. So.. I made smaller models I can mix with the big ones, using a fixed offset, and it looks pretty good. Give me the word and I'll send 'em over.

:)

<edit>
That figures. About an hour after I finished putting the final touches on the smaller palm models I found the problem with the terrain displacement/compute terrain discrepancy. Now stuff sits exactly on the terrain, and I can use the built-in size variation feature, largely eliminating the need for the smaller models to begin with.

::)   :D
</edit>

reck

Quote from: mr-miley on September 17, 2007, 10:01:07 am
OK all, I have updated the Horsechestnut.zip file on my site with the new one containing the bumpmap for the bark. I have also updated the preview images as well.
The link is http://www.gintdev.co.uk/mr-miley/tgos.html

Ta

Miles


Hey that bumpmap looks really good on the horsechestnut. Downloading now...thanks!           

Aenea

Besides that this is great work....*lol*

I have a question about the bumpmaps:

If you import an object and with it all the shaders...where do I place the bumpmap? As displacement ???? I´m not sure where the right place is for it....

Thanks in advance for the answer guys

Aenea

Harvey Birdman

Yes, it is used as the displacement image.

N810

not bad... but on real palms the displacement should angled upward at least 45%  ;D
Hmmm... wonder what this button does....

Harvey Birdman

It depends on the species, actually, and there is quite a variety. This was meant to be a  'Sea Palm' of the sort one would see in the South Pacific. Those have fairly smooth trunks. (Although I ended up using them in an oasis scene... oh, well...)

:)