Nikon D850: Hercules Rising

Started by René, December 11, 2017, 10:00:25 am

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René

December 11, 2017, 10:00:25 am Last Edit: December 11, 2017, 10:13:31 am by René
Make sure you watch this in 4K

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JtH6NusMUh8




Dune


cyphyr

Stunning but it doesn't look "real".
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René

Of course, you would never be able to see it in this way with your own eyes. The galaxy and the rising sun together look weird.

pokoy

Quote from: cyphyr on December 11, 2017, 12:30:32 pm
Stunning but it doesn't look "real".

I guess it is but there certainly is some (heavy) post production. One thing you can see clearly is that the trees keep the same lighting although the sun rises and the sky gets brighter, those are the shots that tend to look artificial. Still, fantastic footage.

Kadri


Nice videos.
The beginning shots looked nearly like renders too to me.
Looks like there is static strong local artificial lighting. That could be the one of the reasons maybe.

René

Quote from: Kadri on December 12, 2017, 10:01:51 am


Looks like there is static strong local artificial lighting.


I think so too Kadri. At some point the light comes from below at an angle.

mhall

Quote from: René on December 12, 2017, 03:40:14 am
Of course, you would never be able to see it in this way with your own eyes. The galaxy and the rising sun together look weird.


That's actually not the sun rising, but the moon. :)

There is static/local lighting, of course, for the trees, but the change in exposure in the sky is due to the moonrise.

There is a good (long) write up on the making of here:

https://nikonrumors.com/2017/12/15/the-making-of-the-official-nikon-d850-time-lapse-hercules-rising.aspx/

The local lighting on the trees could easily be balanced to the brightness of the moonlight, resulting in the effect you see with no post-production.

Regards,
Micheal

René