As internet forums die off, finding community can be harder than ever

Started by Kadri, February 27, 2020, 12:57:01 pm

Previous topic - Next topic

WAS

Ironic considering I was just approached by a admin of planet renders to help revamp and modernize the website and it's aim. Based off an email I sent years upon years prior lol

I still like forums, but I do think there are better platforms now. HumHub for example is a great social network, I dabbled in development there in the beginning.

Kadri

If they are kinda like a better forum software background i suppose they are kinda a forum in that sense in the end?
Although with much more possibilities i think? I don't know.

sboerner

Interesting link, thanks for posting. (Even though it's a bit depressing. :( )

WAS

Quote from: Kadri on February 27, 2020, 05:09:33 pmIf they are kinda like a better forum software background i suppose they are kinda a forum in that sense in the end?
Although with much more possibilities i think? I don't know.

It's more like facebook. You have your profile, and you can make "Spaces" which are like pages or groups. It's geared more towards networking in enterprises, like for example a VFX firm could use it to get all their employees together across their studios and network.

Dune

Depressing indeed. FB is already far too (dangerously) powerful, so any dilution with multiple deidicated forums (fora?) would be welcomed, as far as I'm concerned. If this forum goes, I'm off too.

sboerner

Agree. Facebook and its ilk aren't communities, they are global data-mining enterprises. If you haven't read FB's EULA, you should, especially if you use it to share creative work.

(Love the word "fora." Sounds so democratic.)

WAS

I'm fairly positive they follow the law. IP means nothing legally unless you register it. One of the main reasons I share very little anymore. Doesn't matter if it's here or there. And I guarantee you this forum is content mined. It's a given being a public forum and not locked down to user accounts.

Bunch of my non-commercial shaders are on warezbb with no license, for example.

This may help clear things up with Facebook regarding registered content: https://m.facebook.com/help/intellectual_property

sboerner

I'm sure that's true. I wasn't referring to having your work stolen by other users, however, but by the broad rights that Facebook asserts over everything you post:


QuoteSpecifically, when you share, post, or upload content that is covered by intellectual property rights on or in connection with our Products, you grant us a non-exclusive, transferable, sub-licensable, royalty-free, and worldwide license to host, use, distribute, modify, run, copy, publicly perform or display, translate, and create derivative works of your content (consistent with your privacy and application settings). This means, for example, that if you share a photo on Facebook, you give us permission to store, copy, and share it with others (again, consistent with your settings) such as service providers that support our service or other Facebook Products you use.This license will end when your content is deleted from our systems.


This is consistent with Facebook's business model, of course. But I don't like the idea of granting this kind of license to anyone without compensation. It sounds pretty open-ended. And removing content from Facebook is probably more difficult than they make it out to be.

WAS

Quote from: sboerner on February 29, 2020, 12:13:17 amI'm sure that's true. I wasn't referring to having your work stolen by other users, however, but by the broad rights that Facebook asserts over everything you post:


Quote from: undefinedSpecifically, when you share, post, or upload content that is covered by intellectual property rights on or in connection with our Products, you grant us a non-exclusive, transferable, sub-licensable, royalty-free, and worldwide license to host, use, distribute, modify, run, copy, publicly perform or display, translate, and create derivative works of your content (consistent with your privacy and application settings). This means, for example, that if you share a photo on Facebook, you give us permission to store, copy, and share it with others (again, consistent with your settings) such as service providers that support our service or other Facebook Products you use.This license will end when your content is deleted from our systems.


This is consistent with Facebook's business model, of course. But I don't like the idea of granting this kind of license to anyone without compensation. It sounds pretty open-ended. And removing content from Facebook is probably more difficult than they make it out to be.

That's true but honestly it makes sense. If you post something public, it's publicly accessible. It's like Google image scrapers. Unless you apply the right EXIF and site flags, Google will mark it "Free for commercial use". This happens with a wallpaper I made of planets and a certain singer projecting it over herself for a photoshoot. Pretty much nothing I can do. Wasn't registers or marked correctly, only option was direct dispute which just went unanswered.

Even in your website things need to be marked correctly, copyright/trademark info + disclaimer (plus fun robots file) And technically for any sort of actual validity cases to make claims, needs to actually be registered or it's just a battle of court favor

Dune

Well, I never post anything big, final or generably usable anyway, unless watermarked.