Lifting Fog

Started by Henry Blewer, January 03, 2010, 04:43:04 pm

Previous topic - Next topic

Henry Blewer

I did not use the GI render settings. It would have added maybe another 20 hours to the render. Instead I use the high cirrus layer to diffuse the light. I think Martin (Tangled Universe) uses the same technique sometimes. Works very well, but GI would have helped also.
http://flickr.com/photos/njeneb/
Forget Tuesday; It's just Monday spelled with a T

matrix2003

Great image bro.   ;D I snagged the .TGD tooo.....    -  Bill .
***************************
-MATRIX2003-      ·DHV·  ....·´¯`*
***************************

Tangled-Universe

Nice Henry :) The eye-catcher here is of course the water for me. Looks very realistic. The foreground surfaces and models work very well. Those dark trees really need some upped diffuse color setting (go to the object's shaders and raise the diffuse color from 0.5 (most of the times the default) to 0.75 for starters).
The fog is good too. To me it has very good density and colors, very convincing.

Quote from: njeneb on January 04, 2010, 06:36:50 pm
I did not use the GI render settings. It would have added maybe another 20 hours to the render. Instead I use the high cirrus layer to diffuse the light. I think Martin (Tangled Universe) uses the same technique sometimes. Works very well, but GI would have helped also.


As far as I know I haven't rendered an image without GI for ages, so I think you're confusing me here with someone else. Don't blame you :)

It's really a pity you can't get more out of your creativity because of your ancient pc. I hope you will sometime be able to upgrade. It will really speed up your development and quality of work, I bet.
Looking at the scene again, I might play a little with it :)

Martin

choronr

Beautiful piece Henry; you've put a lot of work into this one. The only thing my eyes are looking for are a focal point and a balance of 2/3 terrain and 1/3 sky. This is sometimes hard to do when you have so much good work on all of your areas - but, as usual, image compositions are sometimes a compromise; having to give up certain portions of the scene to gain a better balance. In all, you've got a real good one going here.

MacGyver

January 05, 2010, 07:53:37 am #19 Last Edit: January 05, 2010, 07:56:24 am by MacGyver
Very nice and epic scene as has been said before! :)

Quote from: cyphyr on January 04, 2010, 04:07:15 pm
Possibly dropping the GI settings would help but you'll loose the beautifully lit wisps and strands of fog.


I thought no GI was used at all in creating this image? I just read Page 2...
What you wish to kindle in others must burn within yourself. - Augustine

Henry Blewer

I had the GI light settings tweaked, but I turned off the GI in the render tab.
http://flickr.com/photos/njeneb/
Forget Tuesday; It's just Monday spelled with a T

Matt

January 05, 2010, 11:58:41 am #21 Last Edit: January 05, 2010, 12:00:55 pm by Matt
Quote from: njeneb on January 05, 2010, 07:55:32 am
I had the GI light settings tweaked, but I turned off the GI in the render tab.


The only way to turn off GI from the render settings is by setting GI relative detail to 0, or by disabling the Enviro Light. Your shadows are not black so it looks like you still have GI.
Just because milk is white doesn't mean that clouds are made of milk.

dandelO

Quoteso I think you're confusing me here with someone else.


What's in a name... ?

I think it might be another Martin. ;)

I really can't use GI most of the time because it simply skyrockets my render times(and they're long enough without GI). I use an old 1.33ghz single core PC, ha! I need to save some pennies.

The only time I can think I've mentioned this to do with cloud settings was here, though... http://forums.planetside.co.uk/index.php?topic=7281.msg77631#msg77631
That doesn't help terrain shadows at all, it'll make them darker if anything because of the complete cloud cover. I always use fill lighting, unless I'm lucky enough to be able to use my kids' machine! ;)