Not Real Enough

Started by duff, January 15, 2007, 12:00:43 pm

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duff

The render below is the sum of my first few (hundered) attempts at creating a scene, and whilst I like it, I feel it looks a bit cartoony.

I was wondering if anyone could give me some tips help make it look more like a photo and therefore a real scene. For example my clouds are clearly too defined and blobby but I am unsure of how to get the desired effect. I am currently trying a lower 'density' and a smaller 'smallest scale', but this is just guess work so any pointers would be greatfully recieved.

Cheers
Duff

Will

Im looking into it.

regards,

Will
The world is round... so you have to use spherical projection.

edlo

Quote from: duff on January 15, 2007, 12:00:43 pm
The render below is the sum of my first few (hundered) attempts at creating a scene, and whilst I like it, I feel it looks a bit cartoony.

I was wondering if anyone could give me some tips help make it look more like a photo and therefore a real scene. For example my clouds are clearly too defined and blobby but I am unsure of how to get the desired effect. I am currently trying a lower 'density' and a smaller 'smallest scale', but this is just guess work so any pointers would be greatfully recieved.

Cheers
Duff


Your cloud settings are completely unrealistic, you have to reduce the sharpness of the edge quite a bit to get rid of that blob like view, also the population doesn't seem have any size and position variations applied to it and finally the atmosphere settings are to clear no haze apparent which helps on the unreal toon like appearance of your scene.
This is all from just looking at your pic, hope it helps.

Will

yea looking at the file the sharpness is too high, Im exparmenting with them now. But the haze seems fine in the file provided.

Regards,

Will
The world is round... so you have to use spherical projection.

MeltingIce

Try more dramatic lighting and also a little grain wouldn't hurt if you're truly going for realism  ;)
And yea, the clouds are the most cartoony part, so play around with them some.

MeltingIce Network | Wii Number: 3881 9574 8304 0277

Will

Duff, I have looked at your file and I found that if you lower the edge sharpness will infact fix or at least help the problum.

Regards,

Will
The world is round... so you have to use spherical projection.

duff

Thanks for all the replies. I will try reducing the edge sharpness as suggested and varying the populations.

I did try more dramtic lighting, but am having difficult working out where the sun position is relative to my scene. I always seem to get either very light or almost pitch black. Am I missing something or is this mostly trial and error as I have not come across anything like the sun position control in TG 0.9, although obviously with a whole panet this may be somewhat more complicated, but something showing the position relative to your camera view would help.

With reagrds the grain suggested do you mean reduce the atmosphere samples?

Will

well you could add anouther light or anouther sun if you wanted.

Regards,

Will
The world is round... so you have to use spherical projection.

edlo

Quote from: duff on January 15, 2007, 01:38:56 pm
Thanks for all the replies. I will try reducing the edge sharpness as suggested and varying the populations.

I did try more dramtic lighting, but am having difficult working out where the sun position is relative to my scene. I always seem to get either very light or almost pitch black. Am I missing something or is this mostly trial and error as I have not come across anything like the sun position control in TG 0.9, although obviously with a whole panet this may be somewhat more complicated, but something showing the position relative to your camera view would help.

With reagrds the grain suggested do you mean reduce the atmosphere samples?


I personally don't think grain will help on the "real" issue it will just give you a real world problem look.
There are a couple of things you can do to handle your sun, the simpler its move the camera up (without setting its new position) then turn until you find the sun and move it where you want it, then just hit camera view and you will be back at your scene view. From there you have to be careful with the terrain and cloud shadows which might obscure your close up scene quite bad. I suggest you setup your sun to your preferred position without the cloud layer enabled, after you do that, enable the clouds back on and tweak the layer to get your clouds where you want them.

rcallicotte

January 15, 2007, 02:24:50 pm #9 Last Edit: January 15, 2007, 04:50:21 pm by calico
Try taking one thing at a time and experimenting with it until you get it figured out and then go to another thing.  Like - clouds, then terrain, then shaders, then objects, etc.

So this is Disney World.  Can we live here?

oggyb

To me it looks like a problem with the number of octaves in the cloud shader itself.  It's not rendering any inside detail in the clouds, no smaller bits.  Try going into the "pattern" dialogue box and increasing the number of octaves used to generate the noise that make the clouds.

M.