Waves?

Started by sjefen, February 04, 2007, 05:25:26 pm

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king_tiger_666

I was referring to wave theory which is the fundamental control on wave breaking... basically you could have a wave parameter for wave height, water depth, and so on there are a few more...

But essentially this would allow you to control when a wave began to break, much like the surf on a beach..

How this would be implemented in terragen 2, I have no idea.

Just a thought since I've done quite a bit on wave dynamics
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BPauba

Quote from: king_tiger_666 on February 06, 2007, 10:19:38 pm
I was referring to wave theory which is the fundamental control on wave breaking... basically you could have a wave parameter for wave height, water depth, and so on there are a few more...

But essentially this would allow you to control when a wave began to break, much like the surf on a beach..

How this would be implemented in terragen 2, I have no idea.

Just a thought since I've done quite a bit on wave dynamics


I tihnk its a cool idea. I almost want to try and learn ways of using the SDK so I can maybe try some stuff I have in my mind. I wonder if that has a pretty fierce learning curve....

king_tiger_666

maybe using the conditional scalar's and/ if statements would help in making waves at present?...
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king_tiger_666

maybe something like this could be useful for now, in order to make waves?

http://www.daylongraphics.com/products/leveller/gallery/index.htm

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Oshyan

You can already "create water like you can create terrains" - water is essentially a shader or material that can be applied to any part of the terrain. With the future addition of transparency you might get close to such curling waves.

However I think you should take a look around at the state-of-the-art in wave modeling in this industry - *nobody* is doing highly realistic curling and crashing waves yet, and that includes the big effects studios like ILM, etc. They have put together some specific scenes with good-looking crashing waves and these required huge amounts of manual tweaking and a great deal of render time, but there is no existing semi-automated "system" for creating true breaking waves in this way.

There are ocean and other fluid simulations that do a good job with almost all other aspects of water, but true wave motion and curled wave breaks on a shore are still a largely manual and very difficult process. I would expect them to be very hard to do in TG2 as well, but they may be possible with enough work and patience.

- Oshyan

Confusoid


old_blaggard

Interesting - this is why I hope Matt releases an SDK at some point so that people can program these more specialty algorithms in while he can focus on the core stuff.
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kleinm

thought id give oshyans suggestion a try (terrain-displaced), made a procedural looping and tiling
wavetexture-sequence (z-depth) in 3dsmax and thats the result. I guess you guys are more experienced
with shaders and maybe there is a way to get the curl ontop of the waves (and some foam).
i put the grayscales to my rapishare account- if anyones willing to play around with it:

http://rapidshare.com/files/193349381/waves_Zdepth.rar.html

in max i used the free plugin from:  http://charles.hollemeersch.net/  which isnt anything else then a
fractal shader displacing a mesh (with some additional features like scale, loops, tiles ect) but since
charles is doing a lots of studies on waves/oceans and giving his results free to public maybe theres
a possibility of implementing this in tg2? well just a thought....

Seth

the problem is not getting waves but being able to do waves like Sjefen ask... the big curly ones... the kind of waves you want to surf ^^

kleinm

shure seth - i understand  - but i thought going on from here is a possibility (maybe ill try)...

Seth

that will be great if you can achieve something like Sjefen was asking :)

Hannes

February 03, 2009, 09:48:50 am #41 Last Edit: February 03, 2009, 06:53:10 pm by Hannes
I think creating realistic rolling waves is one of the most difficult things in 3D. As far as I know there are only some fluid simulation softwares that can produce those kind of water movement as you can see here:
http://www.flowlines.info/
Even in Maya or Max it's almost impossible to do this. So I think it's a good start to implement a procedural like the Hollemeersch plugin to create a convincing animated ocean surface even if it's without rolling waves.

JimB

February 03, 2009, 10:58:18 am #42 Last Edit: February 03, 2009, 01:51:25 pm by JimB
I've been looking at this subject since Christmas for these test images:
http://forums.planetside.co.uk/index.php?topic=5487.0

Here's a test for animated waves as part of some R&D:
http://s331.photobucket.com/albums/l469/jimbowers/TESTS/?action=view&current=xsi_tg2_waves_test_06.flv

The waves are originated in XSI ICE, and imported into TG2 as animated sequence heightfields: Very much a work in progress. Any spray would need to be made using a particle system, and comp'd in. As for waves curling and breaking realistically, especially if close up, that would need some serious work I just don't have time for right now, and would probably do using Realfow http://www.realflow.com/n_what.htm
Some bits and bobs
The Galileo Fallacy, 'Argumentum ad Galileus':
"They laughed at Galileo. They're laughing at me. Therefore I am the next Galileo."

Nope. Galileo was right for the simpler reason that he was right.

dandelO

That video is fantastic for a test. What's submerged just beneath the surface?

JimB

Quote from: dandelO on February 03, 2009, 11:09:12 am
What's submerged just beneath the surface?


It's just a bog standard Terragen sphere. Part of the test was about displacing a lake object to see if I could retain all of the sub-surface stuff that goes on, rather than just deforming a heightfield with a water shader attached.
Some bits and bobs
The Galileo Fallacy, 'Argumentum ad Galileus':
"They laughed at Galileo. They're laughing at me. Therefore I am the next Galileo."

Nope. Galileo was right for the simpler reason that he was right.