Wanderers - a short film by Erik Wernquist

Started by Kadri, November 30, 2014, 05:54:17 am

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archonforest

Dell T5500 with Dual Hexa Xeon CPU 3Ghz, 32Gb ram, GTX 1080
Amiga 1200 8Mb ram, 8Gb ssd

yossam

I'm ready to go............thx for the link.  ;D

Matt

Just because milk is white doesn't mean that clouds are made of milk.

boop/bop/beep

Good stuff.  Hard to believe only 1 person did 90% of the visual work.


Oshyan

November 30, 2014, 09:33:36 pm #6 Last Edit: November 30, 2014, 09:52:25 pm by Oshyan
WOW. That was absolutely phenomenal. I have to admit, I didn't watch it at first. But after Matt's comment I had to see. I had no idea what to expect, and it exceeded all I *could* have expected. THAT is the kind of thing NASA should be paying to put on TV to help increase support. I got goosebumps. Now if only I will live to see any of this happen...

Edit: forgot to mention, but I see now in the comments on the video I'm not the only one who saw scenes from Kim Stanley Robinson's "Mars Trilogy" depicted with incredible accuracy and realism. I am just finishing the last book in the trilogy now, and I have always dreamed of a really good movie or miniseries made of these books, so it's particularly amazing to see this now.

- Oshyan

Kadri

November 30, 2014, 10:24:53 pm #7 Last Edit: November 30, 2014, 10:27:31 pm by Kadri

It is the same guy who made the Crazy Frog- The Annoying Thing. Quite different.

http://www.erikwernquist.com/wanderers/gallery.html   
Every image does have a description too ; Kim Stanley Robinson including.

And Oshyan i very rarely use caps if at all ;) One of my favorite short films now.
I think Carl Sagan would have approved it too.

TheBadger

The part that got me was the scene of the base jumpers. I always wanted to fly!

(yes politics from art again) for 20 trillion in debt, we should be well on our way to something like in the film, some idea shown in it. but we don't even have a space shuttle anymore. Have to buy rides from Putin. Makes me really fucking angry! But hey, we have bad schools and no property rights, as well as really good healthcare! So i guess its a good trade  ::)

Even so, it was a really great short Kadri! Thanks for making sure we got to see that.
It has been eaten.

Dune

I wish I could download it somewhere, the viewing is awful online (from my end anyway).

Kadri

December 01, 2014, 08:57:50 am #10 Last Edit: December 01, 2014, 11:10:04 am by Kadri

I use Freemake Video downloader. It works not 100% but mostly.
There are many others you could use too Ulco.
http://www.freemake.com/

Dune

December 01, 2014, 09:35:08 am #11 Last Edit: December 01, 2014, 09:38:13 am by Dune
Thanks, Kadri. Found it on youtube as well and used Dirpy (forgot about that).

zaxxon


otakar

Very cool. At our pace, this will take generations. I think our generation may see robots being sent to explore (in a much more significant manner than today). Humans are too fragile and expensive to maintain :)

Oshyan

"Too fragile and expensive" for what? Have you looked at what we're getting back from our Mars rovers over the last 10 years? Great stuff! ALL of it could have been done by a SINGLE human in a few MONTHs of time on Mars. Yes, the human would have been vastly more expensive to get there, and harder to keep alive for even a month. But every single bit of that science and exploration could be done better and faster by a human with basic field and lab tools. And if something went wrong, having a human there would vastly increase the chances of recovering from the problem. There are some things for which a robot is far more suited, for example landing on a frickin' comet. But exploring planets, moons, asteroids (the ones that don't have suit-melting atmospheres anyway, hehe) is much better done by a human, I think.

So what we need to do is stop lamenting how expensive or difficult it is to get humans out there, and just work on *doing* it. The more we do it, the faster and cheaper and easier it will be. Look what has happened so far with Space X, for example. Now imagine them with a government-funded budget; imagine investing the same *relative* amounts of money that we invested in the Apollo missions but with today's technology and capability... And still it would be just a fraction of the money we spend on the military (and by "we" I don't just mean the US, although we are by far the biggest and "worst" spenders on military; *global* military expenditure is far too high).

- Oshyan