Russia's Next Land Grabs

Started by PabloMack, May 07, 2015, 06:47:33 pm

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PabloMack

May 13, 2015, 12:16:38 pm #15 Last Edit: May 13, 2015, 03:09:23 pm by PabloMack
Quote from: Emmeline on May 13, 2015, 06:32:41 amFact is though - people pussy-foot around because people go "OMFG RACIST" if you say anything.


Yes. It is not racist to defend your constitution. Ours guarantees everyone's right to religious freedom. Sharia Law means the end of right to religious freedom. Stick to your guns and get involved with your government to make sure it remains sovereign over all the land. "Separation of Church and State" also means "Separation of Mosque and Government". The Christians have had to live with it and so will the Moslems.

http://counterjihadreport.com/category/constitution-vs-sharia/

JimB

May 30, 2015, 06:03:33 am #16 Last Edit: May 30, 2015, 06:05:33 am by JimB
Quote from: PabloMack on May 10, 2015, 11:29:46 am
Quote from: Seth on May 08, 2015, 08:35:55 amAmerica...should remain in America, for the good of everybody else.


You mean like they did during the 1930's? I think everyone who has been paying attention knows how well that turned out.  :-\


In the 1940s Japan, immediately followed by Germany, declared war on the USA, not the other way around (Germany had a pact with Japan and Hitler declared war on the USA). I'm struggling to see how US intervention would have avoided the invasion of Poland, or even manifested itself, when the French and British genuinely thought it wasn't possible even after many warnings. As they said, the proof of militarisation arrived when it marched down the Champs Elysee under Nazi flags.

And just to add, the main reason Japan attacked Pearl Harbor was because the US had an embargo on Japan, which was due to entirely run out of oil around eight months later. So it could be said that the US was far from non-interventionist.
Some bits and bobs
The Galileo Fallacy, 'Argumentum ad Galileus':
"They laughed at Galileo. They're laughing at me. Therefore I am the next Galileo."

Nope. Galileo was right for the simpler reason that he was right.

JimB

Quote from: TheBadger on May 10, 2015, 09:00:28 pm
Quoteerrr... America should know that they don't own anything in Europe or Caucasus and should remain in America, for the good of everybody else.


I gave up on Europe when I learned that there are large sections of major cities that are not open to the people that are from there or the government, ("no go zones")... so called.


As a European, I can safely say you're talking bollocks.
Some bits and bobs
The Galileo Fallacy, 'Argumentum ad Galileus':
"They laughed at Galileo. They're laughing at me. Therefore I am the next Galileo."

Nope. Galileo was right for the simpler reason that he was right.

JimB

Quote from: ChrisC on May 12, 2015, 04:36:57 pm
Speaking of Russia...

Lenin and the Russian Revolution: Institutionalized Insanity

https://youtu.be/Y3-kmo7tGWU


Try learning about life under Tsar Nicholas II to understand why the revolution quickly took hold. Rock and a hard place. Even the US libertarian movement was organising labour unions in the US around that time.
Some bits and bobs
The Galileo Fallacy, 'Argumentum ad Galileus':
"They laughed at Galileo. They're laughing at me. Therefore I am the next Galileo."

Nope. Galileo was right for the simpler reason that he was right.

TheBadger

JIM! Maybe everyone is coming back and we will have a TG render hurricane!.. With a few arguments for extra fun

QuoteEven the US libertarian movement was organising labour unions in the US around that time.

The unions helped to stave off communist efforts in the states. I have heard it said that if not for the unions then communism would have been more likely to succeed here.
I'm not against unions outright. Only against union money holding up the Democrats. But then, what else do they have.

Quotesar Nicholas II to understand why the revolution quickly took hold.

No no no. It is much much more complex than that.
The Bolsheviks wanted power not reform. Reform was already coming. The revolution was in part to stop reform to justify taking power. The very beating heart of the revolution was the illiteracy of the serfs.
Life under the czars was much much better than under Communism. Any Russian old enough to remember their grand parents and great grand parents will tell you this. The Bolsheviks sold a pack of lies. German intellectual thought at the time had much more to do with the revolution than czarist corruption.

It has been eaten.

JimB

Yo Badger. Life was crap under the Tsar. It may have also been bad under a communist regime, and the later Stalinist state capitalist economy (where the state exploits the workers and owns the means of production, instead of bourgeois capitalists), but taking the word of a bitter, failed Russian screenwriter whose family was disenfranchised by the Bolsheviks is misguided, IMHO  ;)
Some bits and bobs
The Galileo Fallacy, 'Argumentum ad Galileus':
"They laughed at Galileo. They're laughing at me. Therefore I am the next Galileo."

Nope. Galileo was right for the simpler reason that he was right.

PabloMack

May 30, 2015, 08:14:09 am #21 Last Edit: May 30, 2015, 08:16:18 am by PabloMack
Quote from: TheBadger on May 30, 2015, 07:28:24 amJIM! Maybe everyone is coming back and we will have a TG render hurricane!.. With a few arguments for extra fun


What is everyone coming back from? I've been in Bulgaria for two weeks. What a nice country! I learned that Cyrillic was developed in Bulgaria. It was named after the older of two brothers (Cyril) that created the character set and put it into use in the year 958 AD. Every year the Bulgarians celebrate it on May 24. I suppose the Macedonians might counter claim them for their own. Interesting stuff.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saints_Cyril_and_Methodius
http://www.officeholidays.com/countries/europe/cyril_and_methodius_day.php

Quote from: JimB on May 30, 2015, 06:03:33 amI'm struggling to see how US intervention would have avoided the invasion of Poland, or even manifested itself, when the French and British genuinely thought it wasn't possible even after many warnings.


I'm struggling to see what point you are trying to make.

TheBadger

May 30, 2015, 08:40:07 am #22 Last Edit: May 30, 2015, 09:00:18 am by TheBadger
Quotebut taking the word of a bitter, failed Russian screenwriter whose family was disenfranchised by the Bolsheviks is misguided, IMHO  ;)

Well, Im taking the word of the lectures at LMSU in Russia, and the word of my russian family that owned a farm until the revolution, so. You make it sound like it was a one sided fight, a little. There were two sides to that war.

But I am not arguing that being a serf sucked, of course it did. Only that it was much better than the Bolsheviks told the serfs it was. I am meandering as usual, but my main point is that the revolution was un-necessary, reform was coming anyway. The Bolsheviks knew that if the serfs were set free then they would loose all momentum. They wanted power not reform. The "ideals" of the revolution were nothing more than an opiate. They NEVER had any intention whatsoever for equality or liberty... I would argue that the ideals of communism are impossible under communism. And so would the loyalists at the time. But they could read, the revolutionaries for the most part could not.

But to be fair to you, this argument is ongoing in Russia too. I am not claiming that I am absolutely right and you are wrong. Just that I find the history does not mach the critique the Bolsheviks made... Or their German pay masters ;)

Part of the conversation is what Russia would be like if the Tsar had lived but ceded some or most power as with the British monarchy. I believe that Russia would be a much better place with a living tie to their culture, than it has been or is now. But really all you need to know about the revolution is how the Romanov family died. He did not even want to be Tzar.



It has been eaten.