Who's going to Glastonbury Festival

Started by cyphyr, May 26, 2009, 08:37:13 am

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cyphyr

Well the line up looks awesome this year (well to this old fogy  ;D )

Festival lineup here

Anybody going  :D :-* ?

Richard

ps I have access to cheep beer lol
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inkydigit

no ticket, but I am busy unfortunately...would love to go, havent been since 1990/91...had a ball!...send us some photos when you get a chance to get back!

rcallicotte

It looks like if you attend all sessions, there'll be nothing left of you.
So this is Disney World.  Can we live here?

matrix2003

Wow! That is a huge list!
This also made me feel old!
I have been to hundreds of shows, and don't recognize many names on that list.

But being an old dead head, festival guy-

I would go just to see Neil Young again.  ;)
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mr-miley

Not going unfortunately, distinct lack of money  >:( I'd kill to see Crosby Stills and Nash (hmm Mr Young playing separately?) and I see that in the Glade Gong and Steve Hillage are playing.... Oh yes please  ;D

Thinks.... off to Windows 7 media player to put on a Steve Hillage album... "L" I think

Miles
I love the smell of caffine in the morning

PG

Figured out how to do clicky signatures

efflux

Quote from: PG on May 27, 2009, 09:51:45 am
I'll go when Jimi Hendrix is back.


I stopped listening to music. It's mostly rubbish these days. In the nineties there was lots of interesting use of technology like samplers etc but computers have taken over and destroyed performance. Tweaking around programming notes in such things as piano rolls or minutely cropping up and "perfecting" audio gets you nowhere. No human feel. I've moved back to most of my sound generation happening in the analog world and by actually playing my instrument. This is why I sold my Mac and Logic "Pro" to move to the superior Ardour running on Linux. This allows me to concentrate on actual playing and use the computer as a multitrack recorder, mixer and editor which is mostly all they are use for.

Sadly these days there is nobody who even begins to get close to someone like Jimi Hendrix.

I won't be going to Glastonbury.

cyphyr

May 27, 2009, 02:35:06 pm #7 Last Edit: May 27, 2009, 02:48:31 pm by cyphyr
Actually Glastonbury is only partly about Music and only part of that is about modern "computer" music. Most of the acreage is about the down righ unusual, the side show freaks, alternative energy/politics/art/food (kangeroo steak anybody ? :) ) I dont think I've ever been for the music as such at all, its more obout the atmosphere (haze setting in the double figures lol) for me. This year however we have quite a lineup, Neil Young, Bruce Springsteen, Nik Cave, Status Quo (lol), Paolo Nutini, Crosby, Stills and Nash and of course Tom Jones to name just a very few (I know, mostly old guys). Its gona be a good one, bar the enevitable mud :)
Richard
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efflux

There probably is interesting music at Glastonbury. Stuff we never hear of.

My gripe with computers is that although you can have computer generated music which obviously sounds digital (not always bad), they are also used on performances but used in a way that kills the feel by various processing and editing.

I have a lot of old gear here now to the extent that I can play and record without even going through a transistor. If I record my guitar through this and play back it is way superior to something utilizing modern technology. All the analog dirt and "mistakes" are captured. This is what makes it human and interesting. Working this way forces you to learn how to play. This is why we do not have people like Hendrix who (if alive today) may well have adopted technology but in a different way. If you spend a decade learning to play your instrument you play nuances of timing etc that can never ever be "programmed". If you play say a guitar, you are striking a string, responding to the sound that valves make etc. You are very directly and immediately in contact with the sound generation. This is the art that has been lost. It's why these older acts can still draw crowds.

PG

Yeah Hendrix captured that in a way even Eddie Van Halen couldn't come even half close to. Listen to the woodstock recordings. Hendrix broke the 2nd string when playing some insane improvisation, it sounded incredible and you wouldn't notice a difference because he worked it in. Computers simply can't make a mistake or fault part of the music. If there's a problem it just crashes. Imagine going to a rave and halfway through you hear the windows shutdown theme. ;D
Figured out how to do clicky signatures

efflux

May 27, 2009, 03:35:44 pm #10 Last Edit: May 27, 2009, 03:58:37 pm by efflux
PG. This is exactly what I'm on about. For example sometimes the amps would go wrong. Hendrix would hear this then use the sound to get something incredible. He would play "wrong" notes then be forced to play another note to the make the wrong note "right". This is the nature of improvisation. You go on Yotube and see hundreds of guitarists playing Hendrix or Hendrix style and they use digital effects. You can even buy a "Hendrix" digital pedal. This is all wrong and laughable to be honest. You have to learn but then you need to do something else. Take risks to find your own music.

On the other hand I'm not saying technology is no good for music. I can record my performance onto the computer and do some editing mixing etc but you have to know when this process kills the performance.

If you consume to much time working with computers you eat into time better spent on learning how to play hence the art is being lost.

It's like trying to do an oil painting on a computer painting app. You can't but you can photograph the painting and replicate it fairly well. Painting apps are still cool though. I have a little tc1100 tablet PC which I can draw on but like the music there is a danger of editing and perfecting.

TG2 and similar apps like Mojoworld are fantastic uses of computers because they do not emulate real world analog processes such as painting or sculpting which also have an element of performance but doesn't rely on time the way music does. You can create entire virtual worlds on computers which is awesome. Digital photography is also great because you get immediate feedback on what you are photographing and learn how to use a camera very quickly.

People tell me about various plugins. Rave about this and that. I've used them all but when I fire up my beloved Fender Twin 76 (ultra linear 135 watt), record it onto my 100% valve reel to reel and listen back on my valve hifi amp then the plugins become laughable. THEN I record it to computer. Computers also have latency. This is why I went Linux because it's latency is very low compared to Windows or Mac systems.

cyphyr

I know what you mean, when I used to play guitar my fave amp was an old Hacker valve mono record player converted (beautiful sound) and I so loved my wem 5min tape loop :)
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Matt

May 27, 2009, 03:56:15 pm #12 Last Edit: May 27, 2009, 04:01:17 pm by Matt
Quote from: efflux on May 27, 2009, 03:35:44 pm
It's like trying to do an oil painting on a computer painting app. You can't but you can photograph the painting and replicate it fairly well. Painting apps are still cool though. I have a little tc1100 tablet PC which I can draw on but like the music there is a danger of editing and perfecting.


I disagree. Good electronic is not like that at all. It doesn't try to emulate analog styles (because yes, that is kind of pointless, and that's what analog instruments/players are for). Good electronic achieves stuff that is impossible with analog. It's a new art form. It isn't trying to emulate the old.

Quote
TG2 and similar apps like Mojoworld are fantastic uses of computers because they do not emulate real world analog processes such as painting or sculpting which also have an element of performance but doesn't rely on time the way music does. You can create entire virtual worlds on computers which is awesome. Digital photography is also great because you get immediate feedback on what you are photographing and learn how to use a camera very quickly.


Now that is more analogous to good electronic music :) It really depends on what you are using the technology for.

EDIT: having said that, I used to always fall into the trap of trying to emulate stuff I'd heard before, and I got bored of doing that. That's was my problem, my failure as an artist, but I don't think it's a failure on the part of electronic music or the technology.

Matt
Just because milk is white doesn't mean that clouds are made of milk.

efflux

Hi Matt.

It depends what you mean by electronic. This doesn't necessarily mean digitally created from scratch on a computer.

Maybe the whole interfacing of computers will improve and make live playing of digital instruments easier but at present this is not the case.

Some synths that can be run on a computer do make sounds that only digital can do. For example ZynAddSubFX on Linux is good for this and you can actually play it. It's great and very under utilized synth. Of course I'm not a keyboard player so I'm probably biased in this respect. I do have a MIDI guitar device but it doesn't work exactly great. Sending digital synths through analog gear like valves is also a good trick.

Maybe this is due to me being a guitarist and knowing how to tweak various sounds out of it but I find the best way to create a synth sound is to sample guitar tones then dump this onto an EMU Ultra sampler I have here. This way I get some of that analog dirt. The complexity of which is so great that computers can't attain it. I can create instruments by looping various tones, filtering etc. Then again digital filters don't sound as good as analog. I have a synth here with analog filter. The EMU also completely obliterates computer based software samplers because it is designed from the start as a musical instrument the CPU, the OS, the converters etc. EMU were bought up by Creative (tragedy) and then they made a computer software sampler (nowhere near as good). The EMU Ultra range was fantastic. I bought mine from ebay at £150. Perfect condition. Insane because this is an awesome instrument! Desktop computers aren't dedicated to audio.

However, if I tweak with the sampler then I'm into time consumption on creating these sounds whereas the guitar is very direct even for getting extreme sounds by just tweaking some knobs, using an E-bow etc. I have a Juno 106 synth here. Very easy to manipulate the sounds. Instantly playable. Analog emulations on computers do not get close to this and are a total pain to use. The Juno is analog except for the DCO which is digital to avoid straying. It also has MIDI. It's the best of several worlds.

One thing I do utilize is a drum sample player called Superior Drums. I use FL Studio on Linux to randomly generate interesting patterns. However it is more of a compositional tool. I would much prefer for it to then be played by a real drummer hence get all the variations and human feel back. Sadly music software developers have totally neglected this useful computer based method of generating random patterns for every function. Only FL has this reasonably well sorted.

inkydigit

Quote from: mr-miley on May 27, 2009, 09:50:01 am
Not going unfortunately, distinct lack of money  >:( I'd kill to see Crosby Stills and Nash (hmm Mr Young playing separately?) and I see that in the Glade Gong and Steve Hillage are playing.... Oh yes please  ;D

Thinks.... off to Windows 7 media player to put on a Steve Hillage album... "L" I think

Miles

I love submarine captain spillage and the pothead pixies!!!
you ever listen to system 7??