Author Topic: Nebulae  (Read 27208 times)

Offline Nacer Eddine

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Re: Nebulae
« Reply #165 on: March 30, 2018, 04:09:22 PM »
with fumefx (3dmax) you can do it in few minutes
my test  :
« Last Edit: March 30, 2018, 04:11:57 PM by Nacer Eddine »

Offline luvsmuzik

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Re: Nebulae
« Reply #166 on: March 30, 2018, 04:40:44 PM »
with fumefx (3dmax) you can do it in few minutes
my test  :


Very nice! Wish I was rich.... :)

Offline WASasquatch

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Re: Nebulae
« Reply #167 on: March 31, 2018, 06:47:01 AM »
Well hubble uses a series of measurements to predict the correct colours (unless being represented in false colour to show something specific). Users on earth use real-world color images and composite programs to bring out real colour.

All this is absolutely exactly. But the fact is that the Hubble, by sampling his measurements, does this in different wavelength ranges, and gets slightly different grayscale images. The pattern of each of these measurements is determined by the chemical composition of the nebula and the physical processes. Then you just convert these different components in the colors, and you get natural color variations based on natural processes and differences. In my case, there is no attribute by which I can get different grayscale renders.

I go to this site often. here is the jellyfish from the archives. Don't we all wish we had the power to determine the chemical composition of our own grayscale images. ;D
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap180323.html

As far as animating, I actually made a shockwave object from a torus in Blender a while back. I think an object might render faster than the clouds, I shall have to dig that up. That would give you a way to do a flight path, I think.

That specifically is a colour image by a DSLR camera through  normal telescope here on earth. It was shot in colour, and composite programing used to exaggerate exposure and colours.  When trying to get a picture of lets say, Jupiter, to get it's colours, you need specific settings to get those colours. But lets say you wanted the moons in the shot. you need a super exposed image to bring out the moons...


Than you use a composite program to both correct colors, and merge your images into a composite...
« Last Edit: March 31, 2018, 06:53:07 AM by WASasquatch »
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Offline Denis Sirenko

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Re: Nebulae
« Reply #168 on: April 02, 2018, 09:17:50 AM »
look the semilair job in just few minutes :


Oh, this is an interesting example. I will take note that there are some possibilities in the After Effect (never started it). But, for example, how about flying around this nebula? Or about self-shadowing?

I go to this site often. here is the jellyfish from the archives. Don't we all wish we had the power to determine the chemical composition of our own grayscale images. ;D
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap180323.html

Aaa, did you talk about the jellyfish nebula?)) Well, almost an ordinary planetary fog. A similar explosion, I somehow tried to simulate.

I thought you were talking about jellyfish-similar explosions, such as nuclear:



As far as animating, I actually made a shockwave object from a torus in Blender a while back. I think an object might render faster than the clouds, I shall have to dig that up. That would give you a way to do a flight path, I think.

I'm afraid that then I will have to part with the softness of the edges. Although, of course, everything depends on the subtleties. And there are examples of how your result looks like?

with fumefx (3dmax) you can do it in few minutes
my test  :


The drawback of this scene maked in FumeFX (as well as After Effect), it seems to me, is that there are no shading (in the original sense). In fact, all the effects that I saw are glow effects, only lighting. But in nebulae there are also so dense clots of gas and dust that they hold back the light, completely stopping the movement of the rays of light. Here you need a real ray tracing or similar technology. And this, of course, is not fast. But it seems to me can make FumeFX, it's very powerful soft, although by your example I did not see it. An example of shading can be seen here:


It was shot in colour, and composite programing used to exaggerate exposure and colours.  When trying to get a picture of lets say, Jupiter, to get it's colours, you need specific settings to get those colours.

The fact that we need to do some special settings to catch the colors of Jupiter because the image of another planet is in itself a nontrivial task. This is not due to the fact that the colors on the Jupiter were not at all and the settings can help created colorsfrom scratch. However, if you do everything right, then catch the colors that Jupiter has provided to you. The law by which these colors Jupiter appropriated, was already created, before you take a picture. In TG, however, to create colors, you must first create this law yourself and then start from it painting. I just wanted to say this :)

Offline luvsmuzik

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Re: Nebulae
« Reply #169 on: April 02, 2018, 12:59:10 PM »
Here is a link by a Terragen artist who likes to do explosions. There is a clip file you could examine. maybe useful, maybe not. Take a look.

https://planetside.co.uk/forums/index.php/topic,8928.msg95553.html#msg95553

My Terragen render shockwave is in my image sharing post, Scene from the Observatory https://planetside.co.uk/forums/index.php/topic,23177.0.html
Primitive and uncomplicated. I am going to do this again now that I have a better unit and more knowledge. :)
« Last Edit: April 02, 2018, 01:01:21 PM by luvsmuzik »

Offline WASasquatch

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Re: Nebulae
« Reply #170 on: April 02, 2018, 02:49:37 PM »
Here is a link by a Terragen artist who likes to do explosions. There is a clip file you could examine. maybe useful, maybe not. Take a look.

https://planetside.co.uk/forums/index.php/topic,8928.msg95553.html#msg95553

My Terragen render shockwave is in my image sharing post, Scene from the Observatory https://planetside.co.uk/forums/index.php/topic,23177.0.html
Primitive and uncomplicated. I am going to do this again now that I have a better unit and more knowledge. :)

is this approach related, luvsmuzik? Looking over the images and topic I don't see the relation, but am honestly wonder what you did there. Lol :D
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Offline luvsmuzik

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Re: Nebulae
« Reply #171 on: April 02, 2018, 03:05:15 PM »
Here is a link by a Terragen artist who likes to do explosions. There is a clip file you could examine. maybe useful, maybe not. Take a look.

https://planetside.co.uk/forums/index.php/topic,8928.msg95553.html#msg95553

My Terragen render shockwave is in my image sharing post, Scene from the Observatory https://planetside.co.uk/forums/index.php/topic,23177.0.html
Primitive and uncomplicated. I am going to do this again now that I have a better unit and more knowledge. :)

is this approach related, luvsmuzik? Looking over the images and topic I don't see the relation, but am honestly wonder what you did there. Lol :D

The jellyfish nebula as I understand it resembles an exploding cloud. A long time TG forum member has a few interesting clip files including an exploding cloud. I do believe Dennis's nuclear examples resemble such. As far as I can tell, Dennis is making his nebulae by warping clouds. I was simply trying to engage conversation about different methods, techniques, and cloud variety. Once again, I have probably overstepped.

Offline Denis Sirenko

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Re: Nebulae
« Reply #172 on: April 02, 2018, 04:47:14 PM »
Thanks, luvsmuzik. While I was not able to learn this clip-file.

But I make to make several test renders of a new scheme for painting my nebulae. The colors are now schematic. You can send any custom color to the red and green channel. The green channel is dense gas regions, red is sparse.





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« Last Edit: April 02, 2018, 05:08:57 PM by Denis Sirenko »

Offline Denis Sirenko

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Re: Nebulae
« Reply #173 on: April 02, 2018, 04:49:27 PM »
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« Last Edit: April 02, 2018, 05:10:56 PM by Denis Sirenko »

Offline Oshyan

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Re: Nebulae
« Reply #174 on: April 02, 2018, 07:02:43 PM »
Your method may not be the fastest, but the results speak for themselves. Absolutely gorgeous and realistic!

- Oshyan

Offline Nacer Eddine

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Re: Nebulae
« Reply #175 on: April 03, 2018, 12:43:14 AM »

I did some experiments in after effects
with fractal noise and volumetric light effects
just to have an idea , look what can be exploited







Offline WASasquatch

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Re: Nebulae
« Reply #176 on: April 03, 2018, 12:59:27 AM »
Your method may not be the fastest, but the results speak for themselves. Absolutely gorgeous and realistic!

- Oshyan

Would have to agree, the results are amazing, and incredibly realistic. I've been trying to accomplish similar with his early share, but it takes so much time.
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Offline WASasquatch

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Re: Nebulae
« Reply #177 on: April 03, 2018, 04:10:31 AM »
Started playing around with the scene you originally shared. While doing so I accidently plugged in the wrong nodes to a warp and surface layer (meant for a mask) and created a very interesting motion effect. Refined it down to three nodes and re-rendered and got this.

I just used piped in my cloud into a merge shader, with the A Input scaled to 0.9 - 0.9 - 0.9, and than another warp shader warped by the master warper already applied to the original shape that was duplicated and scaled and merged.
Art can be a window into the soul

Offline Hannes

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Re: Nebulae
« Reply #178 on: April 03, 2018, 05:19:20 AM »
Holy moly, Denis, that looks so incredibly cool!!!!

Offline Denis Sirenko

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Re: Nebulae
« Reply #179 on: April 04, 2018, 08:25:34 AM »
Sorry, but this is also a nebula :))

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